Beekeeping news What's up ?
 
More Bee News ... Pages  2 - 3 - 4

 

If you want to reduce your carbon footprint. Clean the inside of your smoker !

 

New report reveals true impact of insect apocalypse and calls for urgent action
New report reveals true impact of insect apocalypse and calls for urgent action A new report by a Professor at the University of Sussex warns that if insect declines are not halted, ecosystems will collapse with ‘profound consequences for human wellbeing.’
Commissioned by a group of Wildlife Trusts in the south west, Professor Dave Goulson’s report reveals the eating birds, bats, and fish, and the cost to society in terms of the millions in lost revenue and broken ecosystems.
“They are also food for numerous larger animals, including birds, bats, fish, amphibians and lizards. If we don’t stop the decline of our insects there will be profound consequences for all life on earth.

 

Bees: It's not all about honey for Wales' 180 varieties
The large mason bee is one of Wales' most threatened species Could you tell a nomad bee from a blood bee or sharp-tail bee ?
Honey bees grab most of the limelight with their produce used for food, drink, drugs and skincare products. But they are just one of the 180 species found in Wales.
The rest are wild bees - a mix of solitary and bumblebees - with more than half finding sanctuary in former colliery sites, according to experts.
Seven species have already been wiped out in Wales, Buglife Cymru has said.
And five more are on the brink of extinction.

 

Munich study confirms severe decline in insect populations in Germany
Munich study confirms severe decline in insect populations in Germany In October 2017 a long-term, study by the Entomological Society Krefeld hit like a bomb: Within thirty years, the number of flying insects in Germany was said to have decreased by three quarters. Now a research team led by Sebastian Seibold and Wolfgang Weisser, who teach terrestrial ecology at the Technical University of Munich, is confirming the reported decline. The biologists published their results on October 30 in the journal Nature. "Previous studies have concentrated either exclusively on biomass, i.e. the total weight of all insects, or on individual species or groups of species," said Seibold, head of the research group, highlighting the special nature of his new research work. His group combined both approaches.

 

Rampant Honey Fraud Spawns Creation of New Certification Program
Rampant Honey Fraud Spawns Creation of New Certification Program Confusion among honey consumers in Canada and the United States reached its peak over the last few weeks when the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and a lawsuit filed in Kansas alleged that the honey industry in both countries is rife with fraud.
For over 10 years, Mitchell Weinberg, founder of the food fraud investigation firm INSCATECH®, has been speaking about the pervasiveness of food fraud. In responding to the recent news about honey fraud, Weinberg stated: "Finally, consumers are being made aware of the fact that they are being grossly misled about the authenticity of the food they consume. The situation with honey is particularly egregious, because honest beekeepers and a handful of ethical honey packers are battling severely declining honeybee populations, authentic honey shortages and unscrupulous actors in the honey industry."

 

Argonne Team Looks to Insect Brains as Models for Computer Chip Innovation
Argonne Team Looks to Insect Brains as Models for Computer Chip Innovation Scientists at the Energy Department’s Argonne National Laboratory have pioneered a cutting-edge neuromorphic computer chip—modeled off the brains of bees, fruit flies and other insects—that can rapidly learn, adapt and use substantially less power than its conventional computer chip counterparts.

 

MEPs block member states’ move to weaken bee protection from pesticides
MEPs block member states’ move to weaken bee protection from pesticides MEPs sent the Commission back to the drawing board after member states watered down draft measures to protect bees.
The European Commission’s draft proposal was intended to incorporate into EU law the European Food Safety Authority’s (EFSA) 2013 guidance to cut the use of pesticides that harm bees. The guidance indicated how pesticides should be tested, in order to protect bees from both acute and chronic exposure. Pesticides would remain available on the market only if they pass these new tests

 

From biomedicine to buzz pollination: why we need a plan 'bee'
From biomedicine to buzz pollination: why we need a plan 'bee' As pollinators, bees are responsible for many of our plants flowering and for many of the fruits and veggies in our diet.
And of course, it's thanks to them we have honey.
But have we underestimated the humble bee ? Researchers report that some Australian honeys act as a potent antimicrobial agent, with amazing healing properties.

 

Making a business from honey: Beekeeper's mead mission
Making a business from honey: Beekeeper's mead mission Not many people are lucky enough to turn a hobby into a career.
But that is what Matt Newell, 30, has done, using honey from his beehives to make mead - an alcoholic drink - that is now on sale across the Wye Valley.
"I've been beekeeping as a hobby for 15 years, and have wanted to make mead commercially for such a long time," Mr Newell said.

 

European Honey Buzzards prey on invasive hornets
European Honey Buzzards prey on invasive hornets A new study has for the first time documented the predation on the nests of Asian Hornet by European Honey Buzzards, opening up questions as to whether the raptor could act as a biocontrol agent for the invasive wasp.
Asian Hornet is listed among the 100 most invasive alien species and is spreading, seemingly at an unstoppable rate, across Western Europe. It first appeared in Europe when it was introduced in France in 2004 and has since expanded rapidly. The presence of this wasp creates social alarm because it is a threat to native biodiversity, to human economic activities (especially due it predating on Western Honey Bees, which are vital for pollinating and honey production) and to human hetitleh.

 

Bees: Twenty one species in NI 'at risk of extinction'
Bees: Twenty one species in NI 'at risk of extinction' Twenty one bee species in Northern Ireland are at risk of extinction unless action is taken, according to a report.
The study by conservation charity Buglife Northern Ireland examined historical and modern data.
It blames loss of wildflower habitats, pesticides, pollution and climate change.
Northern Ireland is home to many rare and threatened bee species.

 


Remember when a country drive ended with the windscreen covered in smashed insects? Ever wondered why that seems to happen less these days ?
Now a landmark German study has come up with an explanation. Conducted over thirty years, scientists in the city of Krefeld have documented a collapse in that country’s insect population. Those findings are backed up by another study across the border in the Netherlands which concludes a sharp drop in wildlife populations.

 

The insect apocalypse, and why it matters
The insect apocalypse, and why it matters The majority of conservation efforts and public attention are focused on large, charismatic mammals and birds such as tigers, pandas and penguins, yet the bulk of animal life, whether measured by biomass, numerical abundance or numbers of species, consists of invertebrates such as insects. Arguably, these innumerable little creatures are far more important for the functioning of ecosystems than their furry or feathered brethren, but until recently we had few long-term data on their population trends. Recent studies from Germany and Puerto Rico suggest that insects may be in a state of catastrophic population collapse: the German data describe a 76% decline in biomass over 26 years, while the Puerto Rican study estimates a decline of between 75% and 98% over 35 years.

 

Rapeseed farmers benefit from honeybees more than pesticides, French study finds
Rapeseed farmers benefit from honeybees more than pesticides, French study finds For European rapeseed farmers, honey bees buzzing around fields may outweigh the benefits of using pesticides to fight insect damage, French researchers said.
A four-year survey in France found higher yields and profits for rapeseed fields where there’s an abundance of pollinating insects, according to a study by agricultural researcher INRA and the country’s National Center for Scientific Research published in Proceedings of the Royal Society.

 

French Beekeepers Against Systemic Iinsecticides
French Beekeepers Against Systemic Iinsecticides From the beginning, producers of these new insecticides denied their effects on bees: ‘bees don’t reach the molecule’, ‘ghosting is well under control’, ‘doses are harmless’ ...
But faced with these words, more and more studies have gradually confirmed beekeepers observations: imidacloprid is found in both pollens and nectar; the products are very persistent and toxic at infi-nitesimal doses in pollen and nectars.

 

The Bee: “The Most Important Living Being on the Planet”
The Bee: “The Most Important Living Being on the Planet” Its sting hurts a lot, but if they were to disappear, it would hurt much more.
The Earthwatch Institute concluded in the last debate of the Royal Geographical Society of London, that bees are the most important living being on the planet, however, scientists have also made an announcement: Bees have already entered into extinction risk.

 

Black year for European beekeepers
Black year for European beekeepers This year has been a black one for many European beekeepers, particularly in France and Italy, where unpredictable weather has produced what are being termed the worst honey harvests ever.

 

Confronting colony collapse
Confronting colony collapse Researchers from the Ecology and Evolution Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) sequenced the genomes of the two Varroa mite species that parasitize the honey bee. They found that each species of mite used its own distinct strategy to survive in its bee host, potentially overwhelming the bees' defenses. In addition to pointing to how scientists might vanquish these deadly intruders, the findings also shed light on how parasites and hosts evolve in response to one

 


The Amazon is on fire; the Arctic ice is melting. But there is an environmental crisis closer to home.
One in seven British species is threatened with extinction, according to a new report by the country’s main wildlife and conservation charities.
It shows there have been strong or moderate declines in 41% of all species since 1970.
The State of Nature Reports are here

 

Couple to open Edinburgh's 'first honey store in decades' in Easter Road

Couple to open Edinburgh's 'first honey store in decades' in Easter Road Andrew Zalewski and Marta Kozlowska will be opening Edinburgh’s only honey store, Edinburgh Honey Co, next week in 178 Easter Road.
The couple originally sold honey online, made using Andrew’s grandfather’s bees back in Poland.
But in the last couple of years, the bee enthusiasts have spread their wings in Scotland and now own 50 hives – which adds up to about half a million bees – that are kept in Haddington.

 

What’s All the Buzz Around Microbes ? and, Fumigillin Returns to Combat Nosema. Both Good News !
What’s All the Buzz Around Microbes ? and, Fumigillin Returns to Combat Nosema. Both Good News ! In Rowan’s Social Insect Lab, researchers are examining whether gut bacteria play a role in fending off pathogens that threaten the honey bee population.
After more than a decade of crushing declines in the honey bee population worldwide, whole colonies of one of our most important pollinators are disappearing at unsustainable rates ... and
Canada Welcomes the Return of Fumagillin to Combat Deadly Nosema Disease in Honey Bees.
A very effective treatment for Nosema, a deadly disease of honey bees, is now available again in Canada after intensive work by Vita Bee Hetitleh in conjunction with the Canadian Honey Council (CHC).

 

Why does Bayer Crop Science Control Chemicals in Brexit Britain ?
Why does Bayer Crop Science Control Chemicals in Brexit Britain ? The beginning of the global ecological Armageddon
Henk Tennekes first described the systemic neonicotinoid insecticides as a ‘disaster in the making’ Thursday 6th January 2011: In his own words he says that his book “catalogues a tragedy of monumental proportions regarding the loss of invertebrates and subsequent losses of the insect-feeding (invertebrate-dependent) bird populations in all environments in the Netherlands. The disappearance can be related to agriculture in general, and to the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid in particular, which is a major contaminant of Dutch surface water since 2004. The relationship exists because there are two crucial (and catastrophic) disadvantages of the neonicotinoid insecticides ....

 

North America has lost nearly 3 billion birds in the last 50 years — another sign that we're in the middle of a 6th mass extinction
North America has lost nearly 3 billion birds in the last 50 years — another sign that we're in the middle of a 6th mass extinction
  • Nearly 3 billion birds have disappeared across the US and Canada since 1970.
  • A new study found that there has been a 29% decline in bird populations over the last 48 years.
  • The scientists point to agriculture practices, pesticides, and habitat loss as the primary culprits for these declines.
  • The finding is another data point in an ominous trend that suggests the Earth is in the middle of a 6th mass extinction.

 

Toxic Pesticides Found, Again, to Yield No Increase in Productivity or Economic Benefit for Farmers
Toxic Pesticides Found, Again, to Yield No Increase in Productivity or Economic Benefit for Farmers The actual utility of pesticides to achieve their purported goals is an under-recognized failing of the regulatory review of pesticide compounds for use. A study published in Scientific Reports now exposes the faulty assumptions underlying the use of neonicotinoids — the most widely used category of insecticides worldwide. The study demonstrates that use of neonicotinoids (neonics) to treat seeds — a very common use of these pesticides —actually provides negligible benefits to soybean farmers in terms of yield and overall economic benefit. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should take notice, and consider that efficacy ought to have a role in the agency’s evaluation of pesticides for registration.

 

Wasps: If you can't love them, at least admire them
Wasps: If you can't love them, at least admire them Want to know the best way to kill a cockroach ?
Well, first inject some powerful neurotoxins directly into its brain. This will make the bug compliant; it won't try to fly away and will bend to your will.
Second, slice off one of its antennae and drink the goo that comes out. For snack purposes, you understand.
And then lead it off to your lair by the stump, like a dog on a leash. You're going to bury this zombie in a hole in the ground.
But just before you close up the tomb, lay an egg on the bug. Your progeny can have the joy of eating it alive.

 

Veterans with PTSD, anxiety turn to beekeeping for relief
Veterans with PTSD, anxiety turn to beekeeping for relief “I’m in this program to help me get out of the thought process of all those problems that I have,” said Ylitalo, who has struggled since leaving the Army in 2017. “It helps me think of something completely different…. I’m just thinking about bees.”
Researchers are beginning to study whether beekeeping has therapeutic benefits. For now, there is little hard data, but veterans in programs like the one in Manchester insist that it helps them focus, relax and become more productive. The programs are part of a small but growing effort by Veterans Affairs and veteran groups to promote the training of soldiers in farming and other agricultural career

 

Paleontologists discovered diversity of insect pollinators in 99-million-year-old amber
Paleontologists discovered diversity of insect pollinators in 99-million-year-old amber A team of paleontologists from the Borissiak Paleontological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences (Moscow) discovered four new species of extinct insects with sucking mouthparts in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. Researchers believe that they visited first angiosperm flowers, but eventually went extinct due to the inefficient design of the proboscis. According to the research, Paradoxosisyrinae, the group to which these creatures belong, is a kind of «Nature's failed experiment». The results of the study are published in the Cretaceous Research journal. Artistic Reconstruction of Buratina truncata gen. et sp. nov. Feeding on Tropidogyne Flowers
Artistic reconstruction of Buratina truncata . Feeding on Tropidogyne Flowers
Credit: Andrey Sochivko

 

How Bees Live with Bacteria, and Bees Finding Food
How Bees Live with Bacteria, and Bees Finding Food An apple plantation in spring. The trees are in full bloom. But to ensure that they also yield in autumn, workers have to do a real fluff job for weeks: each individual flower is manually pollinated with brushes – because there are no bees left to do the job. Not a nice vision of the future. But in some regions of China this is already reality. And the disappearance of the bees is reported all over the world.
The exact reason for the bee mortality is not known. Pesticides from agriculture, destruction of habitats, pathogens – probably several factors play together. A research group at Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg in Bavaria, Germany, is now focusing on another factor. It is the bacteria that live in and with bees. Many of them are important for the hetitleh of bees. If they suffer, so do the bees.

 

Male honeybees inject queens with blinding toxins during sex
Male honeybees inject queens with blinding toxins during sex They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight.
New research finds male honeybees inject toxins during sex that cause temporary blindness. All sexual activity occurs during a brief early period in a honeybee's life, during which males die and queens can live for many years without ever mating again.
UC Riverside's Boris Baer, a professor of entomology, said males develop vision-impairing toxins to maximize the one fleeting opportunity they may ever get to father offspring.

 

Honey Bees Remember Happy and Sad Times, Scientists Discover
Honey Bees Remember Happy and Sad Times, Scientists Discover While the brains of honey bees are tiny compared to those of humans, the insects are capable of some surprisingly advanced thinking. A study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences has now cast new light on the insects' cognitive abilities.
A team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found that honey bees can remember positive and negative experiences—such as taking care of their young or fending off an enemy. These memories are then stored in specific areas of their brains, according to how good or bad the experience was.

 

Bee News ... Pages  2 - 3 - 4