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Anyone know who the PR team is for this Coronavirus ?
We need them to help with climate change !

 

How ‘undertaker’ bees recognize dead comrades
How ‘undertaker’ bees recognize dead comrades They’re the undertakers of the bee world: a class of workers that scours hives for dead comrades, finding them in the dark in as little as 30 minutes, despite the fact that the deceased haven’t begun to give off the typical odors of decay. A new study may reveal how they do it.
“The task of undertaking is fascinating” and the new work is “pretty cool,” says Jenny Jandt, a behavioral ecologist at the University of Otago, Dunedin, who was not involved with the study.

 

Beekeeper's hives and research set-up 'vandalised'
Beekeeper's hives and research set-up 'vandalised' An 89-year-old beekeeper, who has been breeding honey bees able to cope with a parasitic mite, has had his hives kicked over and his sheds destroyed.
Ron Hoskins has spent the past 24 years researching the varroa mite, which has killed millions of bees worldwide.
He said he was "devastated" to find his research set-up near Swindon had been burned to the ground.
"Whoever did this must have stunk of smoke and been stung by bees so I hope someone will report them," he said.

 

Remembering Graham White
Remembering Graham White Sadly, I have to be the bearer of sad news. We have all lost a great warrior in the battle against neonicotinoids and on a personal level I have lost a wonderful, inspiring friend. On Tuesday, March 3, 2020, Graham White of Cold Stream, Scotland lost his 2 year struggle with cancer and passed away peacefully in a Palliative Care Facility in Edinburgh.

 

As coronavirus epidemic eases in China, life is slowly returning to normal
As coronavirus epidemic eases in China, life is slowly returning to normal Every year, the 36-year-old beekeeper travels to Yunnan at the end of November to breed honey bees, returning in early March when the countryside surrounding his hometown is carpeted with yellow fields of rapeseed flowers.
But this year was different, as the province of nearly 60 million people was locked down at the end of January because of the new coronavirus.
Wu and his friends, who were also stuck in Yunnan, started calling the local authorities, asking to be allowed to return to Hubei from March 1.

 

+3600 scientists: The EU Common Agricultural Policy must stop destroying nature
+3600 scientists: The EU Common Agricultural Policy must stop destroying nature +3600 scientists: The EU Common Agricultural Policy must stop destroying nature
Scientists deliver new ten step plan to reform the Common Agricultural Policy to fight the biodiversity and climate crises
Scientists from all EU countries and beyond say that the European Commission’s proposal for the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) post-2020 must be ‘drastically improved’ in order to stop harming the environment. They propose ten urgent actions to reform the CAP for long-term food security, biodiversity conservation and climate mitigation. If adopted, evidence-based, planet-friendly farming would finally begin to reverse the taxpayer-funded destruction of nature.
The study is available here

 

Trump EPA’s New Rules for Assessing Pesticide Risks Ignore Many Harms to Endangered Species
Trump EPA’s New Rules for Assessing Pesticide Risks Ignore Many Harms to Endangered Species The Environmental Protection Agency today issued revised methods for assessing pesticide risks that will allow widespread harm to most of the nation’s most endangered plants and animals, including American burying beetles, Rio Grande silvery minnows and Hawaiian hoary bats.
The revised methods from the Trump administration, requested by the pesticide industry, overlook and ignore many of the common ways that protected species are harmed and killed by pesticides. For example, they fail to take into account downstream impacts of pesticides that runoff into streams and rivers or the loss of insect pollinators that endangered plants depend upon.

 

Telling a single bee’s story in a creative new way
Telling a single bee’s story in a creative new way While working on a film about wild bees, I learned that bees dream when they sleep. Bee scientist Tugrul Giray, from the University of Puerto Rico, explained that when bees sleep, they move their antennae in an unusual and distinct way. The only other time they move their antennae like this is when they fly, leading Giray to theorize that bees have a dream state.
Honeybees’ brains have nearly 1 million neurons — only a fraction of what mammals have, but a complex brain for an insect that allows them to make sophisticated calculations and decisions we long thought impossible.

 

History of Mead
History of Mead Mead – “fermented honey drink” – derives from the Old English meodu or medu, and Proto-Germanic, *meduz. The name has connections to Old Norse mjöðr, Middle Dutch mede, and Old High German metu, among others.
The earliest recorded evidence dates from 7000BC, where archaeologists discovered pottery vessels from the Neolithic village of Jiahu in Henan province, China that contained the chemical signatures of honey, rice and compounds normally associated with the process of fermentation.

 

Common bee virus causes bees to forage prematurely
Common bee virus causes bees to forage prematurely DWV is the most prevalent virus responsible for honey bee colony losses. It often causes infected bees to forage prematurely, which can cause diminished spatial memory and colony failure. Additionally, these infected foragers may be more likely to spread the virus to neighboring colonies because of their disoriented state.
To find out why DWV has this effect on bees, researchers with the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) collaborated with the University of Illinois and Washington State University.

 

How quickly do flower strips in cities help the local bees ?
How quickly do flower strips in cities help the local bees? Many cities are introducing green areas to protect their fauna. Amongst such measures are flower strips, which provide support to flower-visiting insects, insect- and seed-eating birds. According to the first quantitative assessment of the speed and distance over which urban flower strips attract wild bees, one-year-old flower strips attract 1/3 of the 232 species recorded from Munich since 1997.

 

Millions of Bee Deaths Threaten Australia’s Almond Harvest
Millions of Bee Deaths Threaten Australia’s Almond Harvest The wildfires that swept across Australia’s east and south killed millions of bees and destroyed vast tracts of forest where the insects feed, putting the country’s almond and honey production at risk.
Bees play a crucial role in the nation’s multi-billion dollar horticulture industry, pollinating not just almonds but fruit, including apples, pears and cherries. Australia is the world’s second-largest producer of almonds and growers are already grappling with years of drought.
The fires destroyed about 6,000 hives in New South Wales state alone, according to NSW Apiarists Association President Stephen Targett, with other hives experiencing stock losses as bees perished or were lost in thick smoke.

 

Coronavirus stings world's top honey makers with China beekeepers locked down
Coronavirus stings world's top honey makers with China beekeepers locked down Beekeepers in China, the world’s top honey producer, are bracing for a bleak start to the key spring pollinating season as travel curbs aimed at containing a coronavirus outbreak keep them at home while their bees go without food for weeks.
Jue, a beekeeper from Xinjiang in northwest China, said he has not slept for days, worrying about his 300 beehives that are stuck in wooden boxes about 200 miles from where he has been confined due to the curbs.
“I am really anxious,” said Jue, who wanted to be identified only by his family name. “If all my bees die, I will lose my entire year’s income,” the 55-year-old nomadic beekeeper added.

 

A bee from the age of dinosaurs
A bee from the age of dinosaurs About 100 million years ago, a female bee with young beetle larvae crawling all over her body flew haplessly into a glob of sticky tree resin where she became trapped. Over time, the resin fossilized to become amber, preserving the bee and its parasites in exquisite detail within the clear honey-colored rock. As rare as it is, this fossil bee isn’t the first to be found entombed in amber. But it is the only known known amber-encased bee that has pollen on it. And it’s the only fossil bee with parasites, providing a fascinating glimpse into a predator-prey relationship that continues to this day. And the entomologist who studied this doomed bee? He is George Poinar Jr. of Oregon State University (OSU), whose work helped inspire the movie “Jurassic Park.”
Poinar’s work also showed that the bee – which he named Discoscapa apicula – belonged to a new family, genus, and species. His findings were published in the January 29, 2020, issue of BioOne Complete.

 

‘Bee-washing’ hurts bees and misleads consumers
‘Bee-washing’ hurts bees and misleads consumers Amid the worry over the loss of honey bees, a far quieter but just as devastating loss is occurring among lesser known native bee populations. Wild native bees are vital to pollinate plants. Their populations are declining due to a warming climate, pesticide poisoning and lack of flowers and other environmental pressures.
As awareness increases about native bee death, some companies are taking advantage of public concern by touting their products as bee-friendly or making other claims. This marketing strategy, called bee-washing by critics, uses the plight of bees to mislead consumers. While many people are worried about honey bees, it’s also important to understand the jeopardy that native bees face.

 

Firms making billions from ‘highly hazardous’ pesticides
Firms making billions from ‘highly hazardous’ pesticides The world’s biggest pesticide companies make billions of dollars a year from chemicals found by independent authorities to pose high hazards to human health or the environment, according to an analysis by campaigners.
The data from Phillips McDougall, the leading agribusiness analysts, are from buyer surveys focused on the most popular products in the 43 nations that buy the most pesticides. It was obtained and analysed by Unearthed, a journalism group funded by Greenpeace UK, and the Swiss NGO Public Eye.

 

Hive heists: why the next threat to bees is organized crime
Hive heists: why the next threat to bees is organized crime Mike Potts was aware he was at risk of being a victim of crime, he just didn’t think it would happen to him. But Potts is an owner of an increasingly valuable commodity that thieves are targeting with growing sophistication in the US: bees.
A booming demand for honeybees for pollination drew Potts, owner of Pottsy’s Pollination in Oregon, to load 400 hives of his bees on trucks and drive them down to California’s agricultural heartland last month. He unloaded them to a holding area just outside Yuba City and returned just a few days later to find 92 hives had been whisked away by thieves.

 

Bees may struggle in winds caused by global warming, study finds
Bees may struggle in winds caused by global warming, study finds A hardworking honey bee might feel aggrieved to be tricked into a garden shed to feed from a fake flower. Worse, she is blasted by a cheap household fan. And then timed to see how many fake flowers she can visit in 90 seconds.
But the honey bees’ tormentors are trying to help them: their ordeal is a controlled experiment that reveals how high wind speeds significantly reduce the efficiency of their foraging

 

Tiny Dancer: Scientists spy on booty-shaking bees to help conservation
Scientists spy on booty-shaking bees to help conservation We've long known honey bees shake their behinds to communicate the location of high-value flower patches to one another, a form of signaling that scientists refer to as "waggle dances."
A group of US biologists have now decoded the meaning of over 1,500 of these jigs, providing conservation groups trying to boost the imperiled species' population with new insights into their dietary preferences.
"The thing I think is the most interesting about bees is their communication," Morgan Carr-Markell, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota and the lead author of a new study published in the journal PLOS One, told AFP.

 

Life lessons from Europe's last wild beekeeper
Life lessons from Europe's last wild beekeeper One of the more unlikely films competing in this weekend's Oscars is a fascinating story about a wild beekeeper in the Balkans. Honeyland has a strong ecological message, but it's the life story of the woman at the centre of the film that has struck a chord around the world.
Honeyland is the first film to compete for both the best documentary award and best international feature film. The documentary's success is even more remarkable because it started almost accidentally.

 

Varroa Mites: New Guide Outlines Integrated Pest Management Options
Varroa Mites: New Guide Outlines Integrated Pest Management Options Imagine a pest that can invade honey bee hives, spread numerous diseases, deplete honey bee nutrition stores, ravage the honey bee immune system, and multiply rapidly: meet the Varroa destructor mite.
These destructive pests are responsible for heavy economic losses, caused by their infestation of beehives in almost every corner of the globe. But how did this problem start, what does this pest do, and what does the future look like for honey bees? These questions are answered in detail in a new article on the biology and management of Varroa mites, published in January in the open-access Journal of Integrated pest Management.

 

Bee Rebuild and Recovery Appeal - Bees for Development
Bee Rebuild and Recovery Appeal - Bees for Development  Large parts of South and East Australia have been ravaged by wildfires. The destruction of natural habitats has great impact for Australian beekeepers who produce 70-80% of their honey from forests. There is some positive news: hive losses were minimised by the fast work of beekeepers who moved ahead of the fires and shifted bees outside of harm’s way. People such as our friends at Beechworth Honey have helped beekeepers relocate hives to safe areas, away from fire risk. Beechworth are supporting Australia’s registered charity for bees, the Wheen Bee Foundation, and you can donate to their Bee Rebuild & Recovery Fund.

 

Bumblebees' decline points to mass extinction – study
Bumblebees' decline points to mass extinction Bumblebees are in drastic decline across Europe and North America owing to hotter and more frequent extremes in temperatures, scientists say.
A study suggests the likelihood of a bumblebee population surviving in any given place has declined by 30% in the course of a single human generation. The researchers say the rates of decline appear to be “consistent with a mass extinction”.

 

Oldest Cure that Never Spoils: Honey
Oldest Cure that Never Spoils: Honey With winter months come runny noses, scratchy throats and headaches. Maybe not a cure to all but honey can be used to relieve and prevent many of our little – and sometimes big – aches and illnesses.
There are many remedies made out of honey to ease the raspy throat, especially for children.
A very popular remedy is paring up the honey with another healthy ingredient: lemons! Putting a few lemon slices into a cup of honey not only helps with the throat but with other symptoms of the common cold as well.

 

APIMONDIA Statement on Honey Fraud
Apimondia  Statement  on  Honey  Fraud APIMONDIA Statement on Honey Fraud is the official position of APIMONDIA regarding honey purity, authenticity, fair modes of production, and the best available recommended methods to detect and prevent honey fraud.
This Statement aims to be a trusted source for authorities, traders, supermarkets, retailers, manufacturers, consumers, and other stakeholders of the honey trade chain to ensure they stay updated with the current concepts and new testing developments regarding honey purity and authenticity. It is also a guide to promote best practices for the prevention of honey fraud and all of its insidious negative side effects on bees, beekeepers, crop pollination, and food security.

 

Canberra bushfire that shut down airport and threatened homes was accidentally caused by beekeepers
Canberra bushfire that shut down airport and threatened homes was accidentally caused by beekeepers A fire that threatened homes and shut down the Canberra Airport was accidentally caused by beekeepers working on a biosecurity program.
Canberra Region Beekeepers president Dermot Asis Sha'Non said an apiarist was trying to complete necessary hive checks on Wednesday January 22 when they accidentally started the fire

 

Wasps' gut microbes help them—and their offspring—survive pesticides
Wasps' gut microbes help them—and their offspring—survive pesticides Exposure to the widely used pesticide atrazine leads to heritable changes in the gut microbiome of wasps, finds a study publishing February 4 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. Additionally, the altered microbiome confers atrazine resistance, which is inherited across successive generations not exposed to the pesticide.
"After a single exposure to some chemicals—xenobiotics—the gut microbiome can be permanently affected," says senior study author Robert Brucker of Harvard University. "Exposure can have lasting changes to future generations even after an exposure risk is eliminated."

 

Honey in Winter: The Magic Ingredient
Honey in Winter: The Magic Ingredient We all love winter for different reasons, be it the snow or the chilly weather or the warmth of cuddles or just the delicious food. But winters also mean a lot of health problems from the most basic throat infection and cough to joint pains, we simply must deal with these ailments due to the drop in the temperature and the chilly air. Now, this is one reason why a lot of people dislike this cuddle season with a chilly breeze. If you’re one of those people who struggle with health issues due to this cold weather, you may want to take some extra care of your health.

 

Help bees by not mowing dandelions
Help bees by not mowing dandelions Gardeners should avoid mowing over dandelions on their lawn if they want to help bees, according to the new president of the British Ecological Society.
Dandelions – which will start flowering in the UK this month – provide a valuable food source for early pollinators coming out of hibernation, including solitary bees, honey bees and hoverflies.
Each dandelion head contains up to 100 individual flowers, known as florets, which contain nectar and pollen. There are 240 species of dandelion in the UK.

 

Tweaking honey bee bacteria to fight colony collapse disorder
Tweaking honey bee bacteria to fight colony collapse disorder Genetically altering strains of bacteria found in the gut of honey bees appears to protect the insects against two major causes of the colony collapse disorder – Varroa mites and deformed wing virus (DWV). The researchers at the University of Texas at Austin believe that they could eventually scale up production of the bacteria to help protect hives. ‘This is the first time anyone has improved the health of bees by genetically engineering their microbiome,’ explained Sean Leonard, the study’s first author.

 

10,000 Rare Bees Feared Dead After Attack at U.K. Castle
10,000 Rare Bees Feared Dead After Attack at U.K. Castle In July of last year, black bee hives were introduced to Wisbech Castle in England, as part of an effort to conserve the rare critters. Now, thousands of the castle’s bees are feared dead, following an inexplicable attack by two intruders.
According to the BBC, CCTV footage from the early morning hours of January 8 shows the suspects breaking onto the grounds of Wisbech Castle, which is believed to have first been built by William the Conqueror in the 11th century; the structure that stands today dates back to the late 1700s. The intruders lifted the lids off the hives, kicked them, and then attacked the bees inside with sticks.

 

Welsh beekeeper launches first ever bee suit that's just for women
Bee suit that's just for women A Welsh beekeeper is launching a “virtually sting proof” bee suit that’s specifically designed for women.
There are more than 40,000 registered beekeepers in Britain, including a growing number of female enthusiasts – but until now they’ve had to make do with unisex suits.
Following requests from women beekeepers, who wanted more tailored outfits, Neath farmer Ian Roberts created a female version of his Sentinel Pro bee suit.
His “Queen Bee” suit is available in sizes 10-24 and is a light lilac colour - dark colours can encourage bees to attack.

 

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