Bee News 3

 

 

Woman dies after having bee-sting therapy
Woman dies after having bee-sting therapy A woman has died after undergoing bee-sting therapy, a form of treatment backed by Gwyneth Paltrow.
The 55-year-old Spanish woman had been having live bee acupuncture for two years when she developed a severe reaction.
She died weeks later of multiple organ failure.
Researchers who studied the case say live bee acupuncture therapy is "unsafe and unadvisable".

 

'Catastrophe' as France's bird population collapses due to pesticides
'Catastrophe' as France's bird population collapses due to pesticides Bird populations across the French countryside have fallen by a third over the last decade and a half, researchers have said.
Dozens of species have seen their numbers decline, in some cases by two-thirds, the scientists said in a pair of studies – one national in scope and the other covering a large agricultural region in central France.
“The situation is catastrophic,” said Benoit Fontaine, a conservation biologist at France’s National Museum of Natural History and co-author of one of the studies.

 

Honey buzzard don't care: Raptor raids beehives and deals with consequences
Honey buzzard don't care: Raptor raids beehives and deals with consequences It takes a brave creature to target the nest of stinging insects for a meal. The honey buzzard is just such a steely-eyed animal.
This fairly large raptor will sit on a perch waiting for a stinger-equipped insect to fly by. That's the signal for meal time. It will follow the insect back to the nest where it can start the feast.
Though it's called the honey buzzard, this bird isn't just after the sweet treat of honeycomb. It also dines on the larvae of hornets and wasps. It uses its long talons to dig out the goods, and scale-like feathers protect its head from stings.

 

Design the Man City bee!
Design the Man City bee! Manchester City has proudly thrown its weight behind the upcoming Bee in the City campaign in support of the We Love MCR Charity.
As part of the campaign, the Club is asking Cityzens to submit their designs for what the Official Manchester City bee should look like.
A giant colony of super-sized bee sculptures will be winging its way to Manchester this summer for one of the biggest public art exhibitions the city has ever seen.

 

Welsh farmer develops 'sting-proof' suit for beekeepers
Welsh farmer develops 'sting-proof' suit for beekeepers A Welsh farmer and beekeeper is to launch a bee suit for honey producers that he claims is “virtually sting proof”.
Ian Roberts was spurred into action when a beekeeper friend developed a life-threatening allergic reaction after being stung.
He hopes his Sentinel Pro 3D Bee Suit will end the “nervousness” that many beekeepers get even when fully kitted up.

 

Are robotic bees the future ?
Are robotic bees the future ? There have been a number of scientific papers published in recent years discussing the possibility of building miniature flying robots to replace bees and pollinate crops. Clumsy prototypes have been tested, and seem to crudely work. If crops could be pollinated this way, farmers wouldn’t have to worry about harming bees with their insecticides. With wild bee populations in decline, perhaps these tiny robots are the answer ?

 

Walmart has filed a patent for a robot bee
Walmart has filed a patent for a robot bee
  • Walmart has filed a patent for a robot bee that could potentially pollinate crops like real bees.
  • The patent could signal that Walmart is looking to have more control over its food supply chain.
  • Other organizations are also developing pollination drones to help offset the decline of bee populations.

 

Bees: How royal jelly prevents royal offspring from falling out of their cells
Bees: How royal jelly prevents royal offspring from falling out of their cells Defying gravity: A special mixture of proteins in the larval food of bees ensures that future queen larvae survive. Surprisingly this has less to do with nourishment than with gravity. The special properties of the proteins prevent the large and heavy larvae from falling out of their cells. Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have discovered how this is accomplished at a molecular level. Their study will appear in the internationally renowned journal Current Biology.

 

Honey hunters climb high to gather precious tualang honey in the rainforests of Malaysia
Honey hunters climb high to gather precious tualang honey in the rainforests of Malaysia On a moonless night deep in the Malaysian rainforest, two men perched precariously on high branches use a smoking torch to draw thousands of bees from a treetop hive, braving the angry swarm to collect their prized honey.
The honey hunters, as they are known, are rag-tag groups of villagers who head to remote corners of the jungle every year in search of the rare nectar, hidden in towering tualang trees.
“This is the real thing,” said Abdul Samad Ahmad, 60, who has been harvesting honey in this way for more than 20 years.

 

Finally, Californians are safer from pesticides
Finally, Californians are safer from pesticides It has been going on for decades, but it still shocks many Californians to learn that state agencies spray hazardous pesticides to residential yards, school grounds and organic farms.
Last month, a judge considered those same questions and issued an injunction to immediately stop the California Department of Food and Agriculture from using chemical pesticides. This injunction should finally prompt significant changes in the state’s disturbing “we spray, you have no say” policy.

 

Insecticide treated Cornfields had 10 times more Insect Pests than Regenerative Fields
Insecticide Treated Cornfields Had 10 Times More Insect Pests Than Regenerative Fields In early March, we released a peer-reviewed study that challenges many of our preconceptions about how we manage our food production systems. Throughout the Northern Plains, we compared regenerative corn fields versus conventional cornfields in terms of pest management, soil quality, yields and profit. Regenerative agriculture focuses on building soil health and fostering biodiversity while producing nutrient dense food profitably.
If this topic is of interest, here are two TEDx talks on regenerative agriculture that may be of interest to you:   https://youtu.be/QfTZ0rnowcc  and  https://youtu.be/qRJ0y9LMhI4

 

European Food Safety Assessment Proves Nothing about Risks to Bees
European Food Safety Assessment Proves Nothing about Risks to Bees As European Union (EU) risk assessments purportedly “confirm” that systemic pesticides threaten honeybees and lawmakers quickly clamour for pesticide bans, the stark reality is that so far in this process, political concerns have been trumping science. In fact, politics has prevented scientists from considering the bigger picture, and, as a result, both bees and the world’s food supply will suffer.

 

New research finds bee-killing pesticides may be impacting our health
New research finds bee-killing pesticides may be impacting our health Lots of recent research on neonicotinoid pesticides has focused on their deadly effects on honeybees and hives, but few have studied their possible effects on human health.
Now, a Quebec research team has made some disturbing findings, including how the pest killers might affect unborn babies during pregnancy, and how they play a role in fuelling breast cancer.
Elyse Caron-Beaudoin, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Montreal's School of Public Health, says while neonic pesticides have passed tests related to their toxicity in order to be approved for use in Canada, no one has looked at the long-term effects of these chemicals on human hormone production.

 

Commercial pesticides: Not as safe as they seem
Commercial pesticides: Not as safe as they seem New regulations are needed to protect people and the environment from toxic pesticide ingredients that are not currently subject to safety assessments. This is the conclusion of the first comprehensive review of gaps in risk assessments for "adjuvants" -- ingredients added to pesticide formulations to enhance the function or application of the active ingredient. Ignoring the potential dangers of other ingredients in commonly used commercial pesticides leads to inaccuracies in the safety profile of the pesticide solution, as well as confusion in scientific literature on pesticide effects, finds the review published in Frontiers in Public Health.

 

One-fifth of Europe's wood beetles at risk of extinction as ancient trees decline
One-fifth of Europe's wood beetles at risk of extinction as ancient trees decline Almost one-fifth of Europe’s wood beetles are at risk of extinction due to a widespread decline in ancient trees, according to a new report which suggests their demise could have devastating knock-on effects for other species.
The study says 18% of saproxylic beetles – which depend on dead and decaying wood for some of their lifecycle – now exist on a conservation plane between “vulnerable” and “critically endangered”.

 

Monsanto says its pesticides are safe. Now, a court wants to see the proof
Monsanto says its pesticides are safe. Now, a court wants to see the proof On Monday, a federal court hearing in San Francisco will turn a public spotlight on to the science surrounding the safety of one of the world’s most widely used pesticides, a weedkilling chemical called glyphosate that has been linked to cancer and is commonly found in our food and water, even in our own bodily fluids. Given the broad health and environmental implications tied to the use of this pesticide, we would be well served to pay attention.
This week’s events will mark the first time that the science used to justify certain pesticides will be analyzed under oath for all to see

 

Total ban on bee-harming pesticides likely after major new EU analysis
Total ban on bee-harming pesticides likely after major new EU analysis The world’s most widely used insecticides pose a serious danger to both honeybees and wild bees, according to a major new assessment from the European Union’s scientific risk assessors.
The conclusion, based on analysis of more than 1,500 studies, makes it highly likely that the neonicotinoid pesticides will be banned from all fields across the EU when nations vote on the issue next month.
The report from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), published on Wednesday, found that the risk to bees varied depending on the crop and exposure route, but that “for all the outdoor uses, there was at least one aspect of the assessment indicating a high risk.” Neonicotinoids, which are nerve agents, have been shown to cause a wide range of harm to bees, such as damaging memory and reducing queen numbers.

 

Beekeeper's $20K class-action suit goes ahead as evidence mounts of neonicotinoids' effects
Beekeeper's $20K class-action suit goes ahead as evidence mounts of neonicotinoids' effects A Quebec class-action lawsuit against two producers of neonicotinoids — commonly used insecticides that have been linked to a declining population of honeybees — has been given the go-ahead to proceed to trial after by the Quebec Superior Court.
The Feb. 20 ruling comes as global scientific evidence against the use of neonicotinoids mounts: a study published on Feb. 25 in Environmental Science and Pollution Research concluded that the insecticides are, for the most part, useless and ineffective.

 

Theft of Beehives - North Oxfordshire
Theft of Beehives - North Oxfordshire Bee Equipment have been notified by the Bee Farmers Association of the recent theft of 40 colonies from an apiary in North Oxfordshire. The colonies are all in National boxes; lots have unique characteristics including home-built plastic floors and roofs.
40 hives were taken
Near Fringford/Bicester, between 17th and 24th February 2018 - pictures above taken before and after theft…
The bees were overwintering prior to being moved for pollination and were hidden from general view, the hives measure about 18” (500mm) cubed and weigh about 40lb/20kg each, they were only accessible across a field margin and would have required a substantial vehicle to move them (perhaps a 4x4 and trailer).
The bees would not have been happy at being disturbed and would have required some skill to move them.
The thieves will need care in relocating them as they will have a strong presence – they will require the space of at least 10 pallets and will need to be some distance from people – a town garden or traveller site would not be ideal.
Unless cared for they will become an increasing nuisance as the spring progress as they run out of space and swarm.
They have distinct markings and can be identified if found.
Please be vigilant and let Bicester Police or me know if you are aware of any suspicious activity relating to this – you can contact us via email - Twitter– @ElmTreesBees, at home – Ashanti – Hill Street Brackley NN13 6AL – or phone 01280 703151 / 07759824777.
Thanks - Tony Manton & beekeeping family

 

Global Scientific Review Reveals Effective Alternatives to Neonicotinoid and Fipronil Insecticides
Global Scientific Review Reveals Effective Alternatives to Neonicotinoid and Fipronil Insecticides Use of controversial neonicotinoid insecticides (“neonics”) in agriculture is not as effective as once thought, and can be replaced by advantageous pest-management alternatives, according to a study published today in the Springer journal Environmental Science and Pollution Research.
“Over-reliance on systemic insecticides for pest control is inflicting serious damage to the environmental services that underpin agricultural productivity”. “This new research is exciting because it’s proven the existence and feasibility of a number of alternative, integrated pest management models—which are far better for the environment without increasing costs or risks for farmers.”

 


This video shows you how to make a monitoring trap for Asian hornets and is designed to complement our step-by-step fact sheet.
Find out how to identify Asian hornets using this helpful guide: ID sheet 1 and ID Poster If you think you have seen an Asian hornet, please notify the Great British Non-Native Species Secretariat by emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk as soon as possible.

 

Using pesticide policies as a tool for implementing the 25 Year Environment Plan
Using pesticide policies as a tool for implementing the 25 Year Environment Plan In January 2018, the UK government launched A Green Future: Our 25 Year Plan to Improve the Environment (hereafter referred to as ‘the Plan’). The Plan lays out a range of goals and policies designed to ‘help the natural world regain and retain health’ and restates the government’s commitment to deliver a Green Brexit.

 

Bill calls for neonicotinoid pesticide restrictions
Bill calls for neonicotinoid pesticide restrictions Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D., Ore.), alongside Rep. Jim McGovern (D., Mass.) and conservation, farmworker, farmer and consumer groups, reintroduced the Saving America’s Pollinators Act, which aims to suspend the registration of certain neonicotinoid insecticides until the Environmental Protection Agency conducts a full scientific review.
In addition, 16 environmental and conservation groups have collected more than 100,000 public comments urging the agency to rein in what they view as “rampant overuse” of neonicotinoid pesticides­­, which they allege is a leading cause of pollinator population declines.

 

Urban Refuge: How Cities Can Help Rebuild Declining Bee Populations
Urban Refuge: How Cities Can Help Rebuild Declining Bee Populations With bees threatened by habitat loss, pesticides, and climate change, researchers are finding that planting flower patches in urban gardens and green spaces can help restore these essential pollinators. The results are already being seen in cities from Chicago to London to Melbourne.

 

Australian Stingless Bees Build These Spiral Hives That Is Baffling Scientists
Australian Stingless Bees Build These Spiral Hives That Is Baffling Scientists The hive built by stingless bees has an intricate, clockwise spiral design. There is only a single entrance to each hive. Each hive is coated with a pathogen-blocking sticky layer. It is an extra layer for the defense of the bees since these bees do not have a sting but they can bite with their jaws.
These bees are highly social insects that have one queen and a thousand worker bees who live together in a protected place. Usually, that place is a hollow tree. The bees inhabit the northern parts of Australia, although on the east coast they reach a bit further south than Sydney, and occur in other tropical parts of the world, while the Australian species are much smaller than European honey bees.

 

Too Many Bees, No Matter Where, Can Be A Bad Thing for Bees, Beekeepers and Anybody in the Fecal Flight Path
Too Many Bees, No Matter Where, Can Be A Bad Thing for Bees, Beekeepers and Anybody in the Fecal Flight Path “Bee Poop” ... Over the past few months my neighbourhood became one such new target with the waxy yellow deposits peppering home windows and walls, drying laundry and vehicles. The deposits stick fast and are very difficult to remove.
Our aerial bombardment followed a commercial bee keeper placing 5 large hives nearby. With 50,000 to 80,000 bees per hive, they could be making in excess of one million flights per day potentially dropping their load soon after each departure.

 

War Dance of the Honey Bee
War Dance of the Honey Bee. Ayumi Fujiwara, a graduate student at the University of Tokyo, and colleagues simulated wasp attacks on hives of the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) to test the bees’ response to danger. “Giant wasps attack the nests of honeybees to feed their brood in autumn. As a result, wasps may sometimes annihilate a whole honeybee colony,” she says.
The researchers found that the bees did use a waggle dance as a warning signal, but only in response to sightings of one wasp species, Vespa mandarinia japonica. “The hive entrance dance informs bees’ nestmates of a specific emergency and of the urgent necessity to collect odorous plant materials as a counterattack strategy,” Fujiwara says. The bees collect stinky plant materials, such as leaves from Nepalese smartweed (Persicaria nepalensis), and smear them at the hive entrance to deter the wasps.

 

Neonicotinoids and water. Nature drowned in pesticides
Neonicotinoids and water. Nature drowned in pesticides A group of Australian-German-Canadian researchers from the public and private sectors collected and published in 2014 data on Neonicotinoid (NN) concentrations recorded in surface waters, as well as data on their impact on non-targeted aquatic invertebrates.
From the data of 29 separate studies, carried out in 9 countries, emerges a ubiquitous contamination of aquatic environments from NN. In about 50% of cases, Imidacloprid (IMI) shows the highest detection frequency rate compared to all NN substances.

 

Industry writing its own rules
Industry writing its own rules New report shows how industry managed to sweep harmful effects of pesticides under the carpet.
In 11 out of 12 EU pesticide risk assessment methods studied by the Pesticide Action Network, it turns out that they were developed or promoted by industry.
Download: Industry writings its own rules.pdf
Pan press release: writing its own rules feb 2018.pdf

 

Miami beekeeper turns sleuth to find stolen hives. A surprise suspect gets stung.
Miami beekeeper turns sleuth to find stolen hives. A surprise suspect gets stung.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article199984689.html#storylink=cpy It wasn’t exactly the crime of the century, but it was enough to leave one beekeeper buzzing mad: Somebody kept swiping his bee boxes.
So Locke and Brown rigged a camera in a remote field in the county’s northwest corner and waited. It didn’t take long to nab their suspect. But he wasn’t who they expected: a Miami Lakes pastor.

 

This Is Why Some Bats Have Hairy Tongues
This Is Why Some Bats Have Hairy Tongues Nectar-drinking bats possess hairy tongues, and now scientists reveal these hairs are designed to maximize how much sweet nectar the bats can guzzle.
The South American Pallas’ long-tongued bat, Glossophaga soricina, dips its long tongue in and out of flowers while hovering in mid-air, and the hairs on its tongue apparently helping it collect nectar that pools at the bottom of the blossoms. Other animals, such as honeybees and mouse-like marsupials, known as honey possums, native to Australia similarly possess hairy tongues, but it remained unclear just how much these hairs helped them out with drinking.

 

Alien honeybees could cause plant extinction
Alien honeybees could cause plant extinction New research indicates that introduced 'alien' honeybees are competing for resources with native bees and threatening the survival of plants that rely on interactions with specific pollinators.
The scientists monitored the interactions between plants and their pollinators in the mountainous region of St Katherine Protectorate in South Sinai, Egypt. The region supports many range-restricted endemic plants and pollinators whose future may be jeopardised by the recent introduction of alien honeybees.

 

When did flowers originate ?
When did flowers originate ? Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research.
The study, published today in New Phytologist by researchers from the UK and China, shows that flowering plants are neither as old as suggested by previous molecular studies, nor as young as a literal interpretation of their fossil record.

 

Best plants for bees
Best plants for bees This report provides the findings from the 4th year of our formal research which aims to quantify the relative attractiveness of ‘bee-friendly’ garden plants.
The scope of the study in 2017 included:
  • 75 plants including
  • 62 perennials, 3 biennials and 10 annuals
  • 18 plants that are new to the study with a particular focus on annuals

 

Stripes of wildflowers across farm fields could cut pesticide spraying
Stripes of wildflowers across farm fields could cut pesticide spraying Long strips of bright wildflowers are being planted through crop fields to boost the natural predators of pests and potentially cut pesticide spraying.
The strips were planted on 15 large arable farms in central and eastern England last autumn and will be monitored for five years, as part of a trial run by the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH).
Concern over the environmental damage caused by pesticides has grown rapidly in recent years. Using wildflower margins to support insects including hoverflies, parasitic wasps and ground beetles has been shown to slash pest numbers in crops and even increase yields.

 

Update on Asian hornet and Small Hive Beetle in Europe
Update on Asian hornet and Small Hive Beetle in Europe Early this year surveillance for the Asian Hornet, Vespa velutina, was resumed and enhanced trapping was carried out in Gloucestershire and North Somerset following last year’s discovery and destruction of a nest at Tetbury and individual hornets found in North Somerset. No further hornets have been found in those areas but an insect caught flying inside a large distribution warehouse near Glasgow, Scotland in March 2017 was confirmed as an Asian Hornet. It can only be assumed that this hornet had travelled all the way from southern Europe inside a container and flew out into the warehouse when goods were unloaded.

 


Urgent Warning! Asian Hornets arrive in UK. Are you prepared ?
Martyn Hocking details his experience of the Asian Hornet incursion at his Woolacombe apiaries in September 2017. He raises many questions about how beekeepers might protect their hives and their local etymological environment from this most voracious of predators.

 

Who Is Deliberately Killing the Bees…and Why ?
Who Is Deliberately Killing the Bees…and Why? Last night, my husband attended our beekeeping association meeting. He was looking forward to it all day. Talking with other “bee people” is exciting, chatting about the upcoming spring, opening up the hives after winter, installing new bees, etc. I couldn’t wait for him to come home to with new beekeeping ideas and to see his face light up as he waxed poetic about beekeeping.
Only, that didn’t happen. Instead, he brought back a story that chilled me to my bones about someone deliberately killing the bees just a few towns away from us

 

Think of honeybees as 'livestock,' not wildlife, argue experts
Think of honeybees as 'livestock,' not wildlife, argue experts The 'die-off' events occurring in honeybee colonies that are bred and farmed like livestock must not be confused with the conservation crisis of dramatic declines in thousands of wild pollinator species, say Cambridge researchers.
Writing in the journal Science, the conservationists argue there is a "lack of distinction" in public understanding - fuelled by misguided charity campaigns and media reports - between an agricultural problem and an urgent biodiversity issue

 

Controversial insecticides pervasive in Great Lakes tributaries
Controversial insecticides pervasive in Great Lakes tributaries A variety of neonicotinoids—harmful to aquatic organisms—are reported in major Great Lakes streams
U.S. scientists found neonicotinoid insecticides in about three-quarters of samples from 10 major Great Lakes tributaries.
The study is the first to examine the insecticides—gaining notoriety in recent years as a prime suspect in bee die-offs— in the world's largest freshwater system and suggests Great Lakes' fish, birds and entire ecosystems might be at risk.

 

'90,000' bees worth £600 stolen from 'gutted' Bradford beekeeper
'90,000' bees worth £600 stolen from 'gutted' Bradford beekeeper A BRADFORD beekeeper has been left reeling after discovering thousands of his treasured honey bees have been stolen.
The industrious insects were stolen from an apiary made up of four hives, with three of the hives being raided and six of the frames used to accommodate the bees being taken from each one.

 

Is this the end of civilisation? We could take a different path
Is this the end of civilisation? We could take a different path A collection of articles in the journal PLOS Biology reveals that there is no reliable safety data on most of the 85,000 synthetic chemicals to which we may be exposed. While hundreds of these chemicals “contaminate the blood and urine of nearly every person tested”, and the volume of materials containing them rises every year, we have no idea what the likely impacts may be, either singly or in combination.

 

A Potential New Tool in the Battle Against a Bee-Killing Bacteria
A Potential New Tool in the Battle Against a Bee-Killing Bacteria It’s a beekeeper’s nightmare: She lifts the lid on her carefully tended hive and is greeted with a whiff of rotting flesh. Further inspection finds that the young bees of the colony, who should be plump, pearly-white larvae, have melted into a puddle of brownish goo at the bottom of their cells. This colony is infected with American foulbrood disease—most likely a death sentence.
American foulbrood disease, or AFB, is caused by the Paenibacillus larvae bacterium, a difficult-to-control and highly destructive pathogen found worldwide. In a study published last week in the open-access Journal of Insect Science, Israel Alvarado, Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), explore whether blocking the germination of P. larvae spores is an effective way to treat this infection.

 

Opinion: John Cherry, Hertfordshire - "Our job as farmers is not to feed the world"
Opinion: John Cherry, Hertfordshire - Our job as farmers is not to feed the world Our job as farmers is not to feed the world, despite what the ‘yield is king’ lobby might tell you. Our job is to feed our families, make a profit and produce food people want to eat.
Will Michael Gove’s recent decision to back a full ban on neonicotinoids make it harder for us to do this? I do not think so.

 

Thousands of bees are dying in Murchison. No-one knows why
Thousands of bees are dying in Murchison. No-one knows why Hundreds of thousands of bees are dying in Murchison, near Nelson, and beekeepers are at a loss to save them.
Veteran beekeeper Ricki Leahy said he first noticed dead bees in front of his hives in the Mangles Valley last Friday.
Leahy, who is an ApiNZ board member, produces Tutaki Honey through his business Trees and Bees. He said the 40 hives used for queen rearing around his home had been affected, as well as another 186 hives located half a kilometre down the road.

 

British supermarket chickens show record levels of antibiotic-resistant superbugs
British supermarket chickens show record levels of antibiotic-resistant superbugs On the 30th of Dec I posted ... below ASU Scientists Discover Gut Bacteria In Bees Spread Antibiotic-Resistant Genes To Each Other
Now we have "Chickens with high levels of antibiotic-resistant superbugs" (follow the link above)
So what is the connection ??
'Purina HeartyBee Supplement' contains Dried Poultry Blood
Wonder if this has anything to do with the world running out of effective antibiotics ? and/or remember Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease.? Oooops.!

 

To bee or not to bee? Unique bumblebee in Arctic is identified as new species
To bee or not to bee? Unique bumblebee in Arctic is identified as new species Endemic to the remote island of Novaya Zemlya, it survived the Ice Age here, scientists believe, the only creature known to have done so.
It was first recorded in 1902 but conclusive DNA evidence has now established that honey-making Bombus glacialis - or glacier bumblebee - is a separate species.
The findings - to be the subject of a major scientific paper - end a long running academic debate on this remarkable bee's status.
More than that, they indicate that during the Ice Age Novaya Zemlya was either wholly or partially free of glacial cover, allowing at least some refugia where the rare insect could live, say scientists.
In other words, this species - with a distinguishing wide orange stripe on its underside - lived through the Ice Age on this barren Arctic island.

 

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