Bee News 3

 

 

Asian hornet nests found by radio-tracking
Asian hornet nests found by radio-tracking Electronic radio tags could be used to track invasive Asian hornets and stop them colonising the UK and killing honeybees, new research shows.
Scientists from the University of Exeter attached tiny tags to Asian hornets, then used a tracking device to follow them to their nests; the first time this has been achieved.
They tested the technique in southern France and Jersey—where Asian hornets are well established—and the tags led researchers to five previously undiscovered nests.

 


Samuel Ramsey, a doctoral candidate in entomology, explains his dissertation on Varroa destructor, a parasitic mite that feeds on honey bees

 

Our natural world is disappearing before our eyes. We have to save it
Our natural world is disappearing before our eyes. We have to save it The creatures we feared our grandchildren wouldn’t see have vanished: it’s happened faster than even pessimists predicted.
It felt as disorienting as forgetting my pin number. I stared at the caterpillar, unable to attach a name to it. I don’t think my mental powers are fading: I still possess an eerie capacity to recall facts and figures and memorise long screeds of text. This is a specific loss. As a child and young adult, I delighted in being able to identify almost any wild plant or animal. And now it has gone. This ability has shrivelled from disuse: I can no longer identify them because I can no longer find them.

 

How to manage a bee swarm and use bait boxes
How to manage a bee swarm and use bait boxes Ann Chilcott, Scottish Expert Beemaster, offers advice on taking advantage of swarm season.
One way to get free bees is to entice swarms into your garden. I set up a bait hive which has been successful in attracting some of our most illustrious insect pollinators and honey makers into my apiary.

 

Hundreds and Hundreds of Bumble and Other Bees Killed on Linden Trees in Virginia.
Hundreds and Hundreds of Bumble and Other Bees Killed on Linden Trees in Virginia. There was a Linden tree associated kill event in Reston, VA this week. Table in link documents the species involved, what is known and follow up studies to see if mortality continues in subsequent years .

 

Boy, 3, stung 18 times in Burghfield bee attack
Boy, 3, stung 18 times in Burghfield bee attack A three-year-old boy was taken to A&E after being stung 18 times by a colony of angry bees.
Hundreds of the insects were set loose when efforts to move a hive in Burghfield, Berkshire "went wrong".
A note put up near the village hall says: "A hive broke open...we are very sorry if you got stung."
A bee expert said the insects "would have felt under attack" and were protecting their home.

 

Virginia honeybee losses nearly doubles over winter
Virginia honeybee losses nearly doubles over winter LYNCHBURG, Va. (WSET) -- Winter bee losses reached their peak at 60 percent for the 2017-2018 season.
This is according to an announcement of winter losses from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS).

 

Robot Bees Are Coming -- Be Afraid
Robot Bees Are Coming -- Be Afraid Appearing soon over a crop near you will be an army of bees that are bots. Monsanto, for one, is currently supporting a project by the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences calling for the design of robotic bees as a replacement for honeybees, a population that is now dropping like ... I guess you could say bees. In the year period that ended in April 2016, 44 percent of the overall commercial bee population died
Setting billions of years of evolution of the planet aside, industry's solution to a problem that they to a great measure created in the first place, are robotic bees made from plastic and titanium programmed to pollinate genetically engineered crops.

 

'We cannot survive without insects'
'We cannot survive without insects' Many people see insects as annoying pests. But British biologist Dave Goulson cautions: A world without insects is a dull place without coffee and chocolate — and with dead animals and cow patties piling up.
Dave Goulson: Insects are the dominant lifeform on the planet. We've named well over a million species of insects, and there could be 5 or 10 million. As for the number of individuals, it's safe to say that there are many more insects than anything else (excluding microorganisms like bacteria).

 

Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in bees
Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in bees An international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.
"Populations of bees around the world are declining, and viruses are known to contribute to these declines," said David Galbraith, research scientist at Bristol Myers Squibb and a recent Penn State graduate. "Despite the importance of bees as pollinators of flowering plants in agricultural and natural landscapes and the importance of viruses to bee health, our understanding of bee viruses is surprisingly limited."

 

Huge research programme announced to protect bees
Huge research programme announced to protect bees A new study into the effects of agrochemicals on bees across the UK and Europe is due to be carried out by a consortium of academics, governmental organisations, industry, and NGOs.
This will be the first study of its kind to incorporate the knowledge and experience of local beekeeping, farming organisations and academic researchers - including the EU RefLab for bee health - and will provide the first comprehensive pan-European assessment of the exposure hazard of chemicals.

 

Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will do
Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will do The research is important because bees have a nearly $15 billion dollar impact on the U.S. economy—almost 100 commercial crops would vanish without bees to transfer the pollen grains needed for reproduction.
"The blue fluorescence just triggered a crazy response in the bees, told them they must go to it," said the study's corresponding author, Oksana Ostroverkhova. "It's not just their vision, it's something behavioral that drives them."

 

Apiary fire back of Alves
Apiary fire back of Alves Got a call from Moray Estates last night teling me there had been a fire at one of my apiary sites at Alves. Two hives lost but the photos show it could have been much worse. There were 20 hives in the field and if the wind had been blowing the other way all would have been lost. The Police are treating it as deliberate as there was another fire nearby the same afternoon. Feeling a bit gutted but as I said, could have been a lot worse

 

Where have all our insects gone ?
Where have all our insects gone ? When Simon Leather was a student in the 1970s, he took a summer job as a postman and delivered mail to the villages of Kirk Hammerton and Green Hammerton in North Yorkshire. He recalls his early morning walks through its lanes, past the porches of houses on his round. At virtually every home, he saw the same picture: windows plastered with tiger moths that had been attracted by lights the previous night and were still clinging to the glass. “It was quite a sight,” says Leather, who is now a professor of entomology at Harper Adams University in Shropshire.

 

High risk of food shortages without pesticides, says chemical giant
High risk of food shortages without pesticides, says chemical giant The world is likely to face food shortages within 20 years if pesticides and genetically modified crops are shunned, according to the head of the world’s biggest pesticide manufacturer.
J Erik Fyrwald, CEO of Syngenta, also said the technologies to produce more food from less land are vital in halting climate change, but that better targeting will mean farmers around the world will use less pesticide in future.

 

Clever bees can identify different flowers by patterns of scent
Clever bees can identify different flowers by patterns of scent New research led by scientists from the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London has revealed that bumblebees can tell flowers apart by patterns of scent.
Flowers have lots of different patterns on their surfaces that help to guide bees and other pollinators towards the flower's nectar, speeding up pollination.
These patterns include visual signals like lines pointing to the centre of the flower, or colour differences.

 

The pollination of cultivated plants
The pollination of cultivated plants More than twenty years ago, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations contributed to the growing recognition of the role of pollination in agricultural production, with the publication of “The Pollination of Cultivated Plants in the Tropics”. Since that time, the appreciation of pollinators has grown, alongside the realization that we stand to lose them. But our knowledge and understanding of crop pollination, pollinator biology, and best management practices has also expanded over this time.
This volume is the first of two “compendiums for practitioners”, sharing expert knowledge on all dimensions of crop pollination in both temperate and tropical zones. The focus in this first volume is on applied crop and system-specific pollination. The focus in this second volume is on management, study and research tools and techniques.

 

Chris Packham warns of 'ecological apocalypse' in Britain
Chris Packham warns of 'ecological apocalypse' in Britain According to Packham, British people have normalised a “national catastrophe” and only see a wealth of wildlife in nature reserves, with the wider countryside bereft of life.
“Nature reserves are becoming natural art installations,” he said. “It’s just like looking at your favourite Constable or Rothko. We go there, muse over it, and feel good because we’ve seen a bittern or some avocets or orchids. But on the journey home there’s nothing – only wood pigeons and non-native pheasants and dead badgers on the side of the road.

 

French Beekeepers Accuse Bayer after Glyphosate Found in Honey
French Beekeepers Accuse Bayer after Glyphosate Found in Honey The head of the cooperative in the Aisne region, which represents some 200 beekeepers, said Famille Michaud, one of the country’s largest honey marketers, found the chemical in three batches supplied by one of its members.
“They systematically analyse the honey shipments they receive, and they found glyphosate,” Jean-Marie Camus said.
The weedkiller, introduced by the US agro-giant Monsanto under the Roundup brand name, is the most widely used in France, where President Emmanuel Macron has vowed to outlaw it by 2021.

 

‘Bees are dying’: Beekeepers stage Paris mock funeral
‘Bees are dying’: Beekeepers stage Paris mock funeral Bees in France are dying at an alarming rate, say beekeepers who staged a mock funeral in central Paris on Thursday, calling on the government to take urgent action to stave off an ecological disaster.
French beekeepers say an average of 30 percent of bee colonies died following the last winter, a devastating blow they blamed on the use of pesticides across the country.

 

Bees understand the concept of zero
Bees understand the concept of zero Scientists have discovered honeybees can understand the concept of zero, putting them in an elite club of clever animals that can grasp the abstract mathematical notion of nothing.
In research published in the journal Science, Australian and French researchers tested whether honey bees can rank numerical quantities and understand that zero belongs at the lower end of a sequence of numbers.

 

Inside the brains of killer bees
Inside the brains of killer bees Africanized honeybees, commonly known as "killer bees," are much more aggressive than their European counterparts. Now researchers have examined neuropeptide changes that take place in Africanized honeybees' brains during aggressive behavior. The researchers, who report their results in the Journal of Proteome Research, also showed they could turn gentle bees into angry ones by injecting them with certain peptides

 

Bee Saving Paper
Bee Saving Paper After a century of rapid industrialisation and unprecedented urban development, bees have to fly much further in search of the plants they need. Long distances exhaust them. This is putting them on the verge of extinction.
That’s why we created Bee Saving Paper - an innovative, biodegradable material that can be used for many purposes and works like an energy drink for bees to help them fly further.

 

540m-year-old bug tracks are oldest footprints ever discovered
540m-year-old bug tracks are oldest footprints ever discovered The oldest known footprints on Earth, left by an ancient creepy-crawly more than 500 million years ago, have been discovered in China.
The tracks were left by a primitive ancestor of modern-day insects or worms, according to scientists. Precisely what the creature looked like is a mystery, though: nothing this old with legs has been discovered to date.
Prof Shuhai Xiao, a geobiologist at Virginia Tech University and senior author of the research, said the finding brings scientists closer to understanding what creatures were the first to evolve pairs of legs.

 

B.C. beekeepers cautious as 233 scientists urge neonic pesticide ban
B.C. beekeepers cautious as 233 scientists urge neonic pesticide ban B.C. beekeepers say a new call from 233 global scientists for severe restrictions on pesticides that threaten the world’s bee populations is admirable but warrants caution to prevent unintended effects.
On Friday, the journal Science published “Call to restrict neonicotinoids,” an open letter signed by researchers in 38 countries, representing every continent.
“They are highly toxic to insects, a group of organisms that contains the majority of the described life on Earth, and which includes numerous species of vital importance to humans such as pollinators,” the letter stated. “The balance of evidence strongly suggests that these chemicals are harming beneficial insects and contributing to the current massive loss of global biodiversity.”

 

Great British Bee Count 2018 - in pictures
Great British Bee Count 2018 - in pictures As the fifth annual Great British Bee Count gets under way, wildlife and gardening experts are calling on the public to grow weeds to help Britain’s bees. The count, which will provide the first national health check for wild bees and other pollinators, runs until 30 June

 

Neonicotinoids Ban Officially Registered in the EU
Neonicotinoids Ban Officially Registered in the EU The European Commission has officially adopted the approved regulations to completely ban all outdoor uses of three neonicotinoid substances (clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam). The ban is now officially in the registries since May 29, ensuring an improved protection of pollinators and the environment. Besides, regulations can now be consulted and retrieved from the official website of the Commission. Available in all EU-28 languages, you may find the document here. The ban will come into effect starting December 19.

 

Letter: When the bees are gone, politicians can eat their money
Letter: When the bees are gone, politicians can eat their money Editor: I just heard on the news that the European Union has banned all pesticides that are harmful to honey bees and wild bees.
Also, New Brunswick at the same time announced that they have lost 80 per cent of their honey bees. What’s the matter with our politicians? When the bees are completely gone we will all suffer.
And then those same politicians can chew on their almighty dollars and I hope they don’t choke on them.

 

Mind your beeswax: global price surge leaves bearded Australians in a tangle
Mind your beeswax: global price surge leaves bearded Australians in a tangle The soaring price of Australian beeswax could be bad news for local beard owners – and good news for scammers – as demand for high-quality beeswax heats up. New uses for the wax – from cosmetics to food wraps – and the comparative health of Australia’s bees have driven the export price of Australian beeswax up in the global marketplace.

 

Bees adjust to seasons with nutrients in flowers and 'dirty water'
Bees adjust to seasons with nutrients in flowers and 'dirty water' Researchers at Tufts University have discovered that honey bees alter their diet of nutrients according to the season, particularly as winter approaches. A spike in calcium consumption in the fall, and high intake of potassium, help prepare the bees for colder months when they likely need those minerals to generate warmth through rapid muscle contractions. A careful inventory of the bees' nutrient intake revealed shifting sources (from flowers to mineral rich 'dirty water') and how limitations in nutrient availability from these sources can have implications for the health of both managed and wild colonies.

 

Wasps drum to alert one another of food nearby
Wasps drum to alert one another of food nearby New research shows wasps have their own way of communicating to each other about mealtimes -- drumming on their gaster (or abdomen) to let each other know that there's food nearby. For nearly five decades, researchers thought the gastral drumming was a signal of hunger. These findings are the first evidence that wasps have complex communication about food, just as ants, bees, termites, and other social insects.

 

Bumblebees confused by iridescent colours
Bumblebees confused by iridescent colours A new study published today by the University of Bristol shows for the first time that dazzling iridescent colours in animals can act as camouflage.
Iridescence is a form of structural colour which uses regular repeating nanostructures to reflect light at slightly different angles, causing a colour-change effect.

 

Making the Case for Better Coffee through Bees
Making the Case for Better Coffee through Bees Pollination by bees and other animals contributes five to eight percent of global crop production value, varying widely among crops — from 0 percent in wheat to 95 percent in squash and pumpkin, for example. And while coffee production isn’t as dependent on bees as other crops, research shows that pollinators do impact productivity and quality.
Because Arabica is self-fertilizing, it will still set fruit even without cross pollination. That doesn’t mean bees don’t help, however. Bee pollination increases fruit retention, seed mass, and finally the yield of mature fruits.

 

Are lime trees killing our bees ?
Are lime trees killing our bees ? Is the nectar of lime-tree flowers toxic for bees? Plenty of people seem to think so. In his super book, A Sting in the Tale, Dave Goulson says: “Buff-tailed and white tailed bumblebees love the flowers of lime trees, although there is something in the nectar which seems to make them dopey and even sometimes kill them”.
The belief that lime trees can harm bees has been around since at least the 16th century, so a couple of Kew botanists decided that it was time to review the evidence. Their conclusions were published in the Journal Biology Letters.

 

Pollinator Strategy for Scotland 2017–2027
Pollinator Strategy for Scotland 2017–2027 The Pollinator Strategy for Scotland 2017-2027 sets out how Scotland can continue to be a place where pollinators thrive, along with actions that are needed to help achieve that objective.

 

America's beekeepers report 40 percent winter bee loss
America's beekeepers report 40 percent winter bee loss America's beekeepers lost 40 percent of their managed honey bee colonies in the past year, Auburn University researchers say, and that's a loss rate 7 percent above the previous year.
Greater colony mortality during the 2017-18 winter pushed the overall loss rate higher, researchers said. Survey respondents reported a loss rate of almost 31 percent, which is almost 3 percent above the 10-year average and a big jump from 2016-17's 21 percent death rate.

 

Raiding the rape field
Raiding the rape field Oilseed rape fields are home to a variety of insects that bother farmers. The pollen beetle is one of them. The beetle's larvae feed on the flower buds of oilseed rape causing damage and crop failure. The larvae of different species of weevils also have a preference for rape: They tunnel into the plants' stems making them wither and die.
Conventional farming practice generally relies on chemical pesticides to exterminate the hungry insects. But obviously their populations can also be kept at bay by promoting their natural enemies. These include ground beetles, spiders and other predatory insects that live on the ground.
Study can be found in : Journal of Applied Ecology

 

'Virtual safe space' to help bumblebees
'Virtual safe space' to help bumblebees The many threats facing bumblebees can be tested using a "virtual safe space" created by scientists at the University of Exeter. Bumble-BEEHAVE provides a computer simulation of how colonies will develop and react to multiple factors including pesticides, parasites and habitat loss.
The tool lets researchers, farmers, policymakers and other interested parties test different land management techniques to find out what will be most beneficial for bees. Field experiments can be very timely and costly, so resultsfrom Bumble-BEEHAVE can help refine and reduce the number of experiments needed.

 

Ontario Beekeepers Experience Overwhelming Losses
Ontario Beekeepers Experience Overwhelming Losses When Ontario’s beekeepers opened their hives this spring, they found nothing but bad news for beekeepers, as well as for the vegetable and fruit growers who depend on bees for pollination. The recent Ontario Beekeepers’ Association survey of almost 900 beekeepers indicated that 7 out of 10 Ontario beekeepers suffered unsustainable losses. Most worrisome, almost one in three (32%) beekeepers reported colony losses of 70% or more.

 

Court confirms neonicotinoid ban was legal
Court confirms neonicotinoid ban was legal Today the EU Court of Justice confirmed that the 2013 European Commission decision to protect bees by introducing a ban on the use of three neonicotinoid insecticides on flowering crops, was proper and legal. Bayer and Syngenta had challenged the decisions, throwing everything at the cases and claiming that: the EC exceeded its remit; the economic cost to the pesticide industry should have been a key factor in the decision; the bee pesticide risk assessment document should not have been used (because all member states had not endorsed it); the science showed neonicotinoids were safe to bees; and that there were several other grounds.

 

American Foulbrood Elimination – a Video Series by Plant and Food
American Foulbrood Elimination – a Video Series by Plant and Food We discovered this series of videos put out by Plant and Food in New Zealand.
Even though it came out in 2015, it’s the first time we have seen it, and thought it was worth telling you about. I can see these being useful for overseas beekeepers as well, as AFB is a worldwide issue for Bees and Beekeepers.
Its a great series of videos about Amercian Foul Brood (AFB) presented by Dr. Mark Goodwin and Byron Taylor, its history in New Zealand and what you can do if your hives become infected.

 

Glyphosate shown to disrupt microbiome 'at safe levels', study claims
Glyphosate shown to disrupt microbiome 'at safe levels' A chemical found in the world’s most widely used weedkiller can have disrupting effects on sexual development, genes and beneficial gut bacteria at doses considered safe, according to a wide-ranging pilot study in rats.
Glyphosate is the core ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide and levels found in the human bloodstream have spiked by more than a 1,000% in the last two decades.

 

A Plea for Use of Honey Bees’ Natural Resilience in Beekeeping
A Plea for Use of Honey Bees’ Natural Resilience in Beekeeping This plea is about leaving room for nature in ordinary daily beekeeping, but also about leaving room for nature in the reproduction of the bee colonies, i.e. beekeeping without queen breeding and without cultivation of breeds. Our European honey bees (Apis mellifera) naturally possess numerous traits including behaviours that make them less vulnerable to diseases and other threats in their environment.
This means that it may occasionally be better to follow the bees’ nature rather than to force the bees to meet our requirements.

 

New Cover Lets in Only Red Light, and Keeps Small Hive Beetles Out
New Cover Lets in Only Red Light, and Keeps Small Hive Beetles Out At their worst, honey bees are known for delivering painful stings, ripping apart their own tiny bodies in the process, just to protect their own hive. At their best, however, honey bees are much more impressive — not to mention, way less gruesome.
“For about 22 years, we’ve had a problem with small hive beetles,”
A transparent, red piece of acrylic shaped like a lid. It fits over a honey bee box hive. As sunlight shines through the acrylic, it creates red light inside the hive that disturbs small hive beetles and deters them away. He calls the product the Beetle Banisher.

 

Conservationists put out feelers to save Scotland's bees
Conservationists put out feelers to save Scotland's bees For centuries, they have clashed with and repelled repeated foreign invaders from Vikings to the mighty Roman Empire.
Now Scotland’s native honeybee is the latest species to come under threat from a foreign invasion as the country’s growing number of beekeepers bring non-native bees to fill their hives.
Experts say a gradual “diluting” of the DNA of the native bee fear it could become as rare as pure native wildcats through breeding with non-native species.

 


A new honey bee infection transmitted by Varroa mites ?
Jim Burritt, University of Wisconsin-Stout. The research, with student co-authors Anna Winfield, of Bloomer, and Jake Hildebrand, of Menomonie, was published Dec. 21 in PLOS One, a peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication for science and medicine research. The study, “Sepsis and Hemocyte Loss in Honey Bees,” can be found online.

 

Parasitic Mite Syndrome (PMS)
PMS or Parasitic Mite Syndrome is a condition that causes a honey bee colony to deteriorate and eventually dwindle away and die. There has not yet been a pathogen detected which causes the brood symptoms that appear with this syndrome. However there are always varroa mites present with this syndrome. The brood symptoms look similar to other diseases but the larvae don’t rope. Colonies with PMS will show symptoms of white larvae that are chewed or pecked down by workers. Larvae may appear sunken to the side of the cell and may show symptoms of white with some debris at the posterior end. Pupa will be chewed down/removed or the pupa face chewed part of the way down as seen in the photo. Most of the symptoms shown are from hygienic bees trying to remove varroa mite infested cells and or larvae/pupa from cells. There is sometimes color to the larvae and this is attributed to age, decomposition or secondary bacteria.

 

What gives bees their sweet tooth ?
What gives bees their sweet tooth ? Scientists have discovered bees linger on a flower, emptying it of nectar, because they have sugar-sensing taste neurons which work together to prolong the pleasure of the sweetness.
Newcastle University researchers report that the bees' taste neurons found on their proboscis -- their mouthparts -- fire intense signals for up to 10 seconds -- much longer than the taste neurons found in other insects.

 

World Bee Day May 20th! Celebrate !
World Bee Day May 20th! Celebrate ! World Bee Day? Yes, it’s official.
On the 20th December 2017 the United Nations (UN) General Assembly adopted a resolution declaring 20th May World Bee Day. Every year on this day the global public will have their attention focussed on the importance of preserving honey bees and all other pollinators, and people will be reminded of the significance of bees in providing for the needs of humanity. They will also be invited to take positive action to preserve and protect pollinators.
By: Ann Chilcott

 

Say 'No' to the mow
Say 'No' to the mow One of the best - and easiest - ways to encourage wildlife in your garden is to create a "mini meadow" on your lawn. That's why Plantlife is calling for all lawn-owners to join the "Say No to the Mow" Summer Challenge.

 

‘Sting’ operation to find Nairn beehive bandit
‘Sting’ operation to find Nairn beehive bandit Two double beehives were placed at Easter Delnies over the weekend to assist with the yield from neighbouring fields.
However, by around 9pm on Saturday, it was found one of the hives had been extensively damaged causing a buzz amongst local farmland owners.
The hives were in use and as a result of the damage the beekeeper and land owner have suffered significant financial loss.

 

Bee disease confirmed near Perth and Dumfries
Bee disease confirmed near Perth and Dumfries AN OUTBREAK of European Foulbrood (EFB), a disease affecting honey bees, has been found in two colonies of honey bees in two apiaries near Perth and Dumfries.
The disease was confirmed following laboratory diagnosis by Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture.

 

Europe Just Banned the Chemicals That Lay Waste to Honeybees. But they’re still everywhere in the US
Europe Just Banned the Chemicals That Lay Waste to Honeybees. But They’re Still Everywhere in the US In late April, the European Union banned a blockbuster trio of neonicotinoid insecticides, marketed by chemical giants Syngenta and Bayer. The decision, motivated by mounting evidence of harm to bees exposed to the chemicals, entrenches a temporary moratorium the EU placed on them back in 2013.
In the United States, use of neonicotinoids continues unabated. They’re widely applied to corn, soybean, and cotton seeds before planting. The chemicals suffuse the resulting plants, including their pollen and nectar, poisoning crop-chomping insects.

 

The Great Bug Hunt 2018
The Great Bug Hunt 2018

A Great Competition for Primary Schools

An opportunity for pupils to get outside to learn more about living things and their habitats and to use the outdoor classroom.
Simply identify a local habitat, get the pupils to explore and discover the minibeasts (bugs) that live there, draw them and record their findings – it’s that easy !

 

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