Bee News 4

 

 

A Potential New Tool in the Battle Against a Bee-Killing Bacteria
A Potential New Tool in the Battle Against a Bee-Killing Bacteria It’s a beekeeper’s nightmare: She lifts the lid on her carefully tended hive and is greeted with a whiff of rotting flesh. Further inspection finds that the young bees of the colony, who should be plump, pearly-white larvae, have melted into a puddle of brownish goo at the bottom of their cells. This colony is infected with American foulbrood disease—most likely a death sentence.
American foulbrood disease, or AFB, is caused by the Paenibacillus larvae bacterium, a difficult-to-control and highly destructive pathogen found worldwide. In a study published last week in the open-access Journal of Insect Science, Israel Alvarado, Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), explore whether blocking the germination of P. larvae spores is an effective way to treat this infection

 

Environmentalists call for pesticide ban as study shows extent of insect decline
Environmentalists call for pesticide ban as study shows extent of insect decline Scientists have raised the alarm after a study 27 years in the making found the biomass of flying insects in nature protected areas has declined by more than 75% since 1990. The causes of the decline are not fully understood.
The decline of Europe’s bee populations has been on policy-makers’ radars for some time. Less attention has been paid to the plight of other flying insects but a study published in scientific journal Plos One in October has revealed that they too have declined in both diversity and abundance in the last quarter of a century.

 

Special Suits Bought For Fight Against Aggressive Asian Hornets. Bee Suits On Steroids
Special Suits Bought For Fight Against Aggressive Asian Hornets. Bee Suits On Steroids PEST control experts have undergone training in France as part of the Jersey’s (UK) fight against Asian hornets and have come back with special suits to protect them from the aggressive insects.
As well as sending experts for training in Normandy, the Environment Department has bought two extra-thick suits and long lances to inject insecticide into nests.

 

Honeybee colony losses and threats in Scotland. (2012-2017)
Honeybee colony losses and threats in Scotland. (2012-2017) Results of the last overwinter survey and reflections on what the data of the last 6 years indicate are now available to download
Many will have heard of the latest studies, linking neonicotinoids to honeybee colony problems and the report recently released that 75% of honey sampled in a global study is now contaminated with neonicotinoids. The full list of expert opinions may be found here

 

Eat Honey Every Day And These 8 Things Are Going To Happen To Your Body
Eat Honey Every Day And These 8 Things Are Going To Happen To Your Body Nowadays, something many people like is to enjoy their body. They would like to have one thing that that they could enjoy taking and it will be like a magic pill. All of the things that aren’t perfect will be fixed soon.
One of the products that can help us achieve many great things and is abundant in healthy properties is honey. Only 1 tablespoon of honey can help you a lot and here, we’re going to present you how!

 

Researcher reports key components of honey bee antiviral defense
Researcher reports key components of honey bee antiviral defense Laura Brutscher, who earned her doctorate in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology in MSU's College of Agriculture and College of Letters and Science, published her study on the mechanisms honey bees use to fight off viruses in Scientific Reports.
"This project has taken a lot of patience, time and perseverance, so it's personally validating to know that my work has been accepted by the scientific community," Brutscher said.

 

Pollination Assessment Reports
Pollination Assessment Reports
  • Summary for Policy Makers of the thematic assessment of Pollinators, Pollination and Food Production
  • Individual chapters and their executive summaries of the thematic assessment on pollinators, pollination and food production

 

The Buzz: October News from Peeblesshire Beekeepers
The Buzz: October News from Peeblesshire Beekeepers Peter Stevenson, treasurer of Peeblesshire Beekeepers Association brings us details on honey extraction ...
“The best way to extract honey is in the nude”, says the beekeeping sage. It certainly can be a sticky business, but the local beekeepers did not go to those lengths for their processing demonstration.

 

'Steady decline' in honey crop raises concern for honeybees' future
'Steady decline' in honey crop raises concern for honeybees' future British Beekeepers Association survey reveals worrying drop in honey yield, with 62% of beekeepers saying neonicotinoids are to blame
Beekeepers have raised concerns over the future of honeybees as an annual survey showed a “steady decline” in the honey crop.
The survey by the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) revealed beekeepers in England produced an average of 11.8kg (26 lb) of honey per hive this year, down 1kg on last year.

 

I Investigated The Honey Market And Thought It Could Do With A Different Approach
I Investigated The Honey Market And Thought It Could Do With A Different Approach A young honey-making entrepreneur in Wales, who started his business in the back yard of his parents’ home, has landed a deal to supply 500 stores operated by the giant UK supermarket chain Tesco.
Hilltop Honey was founded back in 2011 when Scott Davies was recovering from a back injury received playing rugby. Part of his rehabilitation saw him walking to the end of his parents’ garden where there was a beehive.
Davies became fascinated with the bees and started beekeeping.

 

A giant insect ecosystem is collapsing due to humans. It's a catastrophe
A giant insect ecosystem is collapsing due to humans. It's a catastrophe Insects have triumphed for hundreds of millions of years in every habitat but the ocean. Their success is unparalleled, which makes their disappearance all the more alarming
Does it matter ? Even if bugs make you shudder? Oh yes. Insects are vital plant-pollinators and although most of our grain crops are pollinated by the wind, most of our fruit crops are insect-pollinated, as are the vast majority of our wild plants, from daisies to our most splendid wild flower, the rare and beautiful lady’s slipper orchid.

 

Expert panel identifies unacceptable toll of food and farming systems on human health
Expert panel identifies unacceptable toll of food and farming systems on human health A major new report on the damage to human health from existing industrial and chemical-intensive conventional food and farming systems was launched today by the UN Committee on World Food Security in Rome.

 

More than 75 percent decline over 27 years in total flying insect biomass in protected areas
More than 75 percent decline over 27 years in total flying insect biomass in protected areas Global declines in insects have sparked wide interest among scientists, politicians, and the general public. Loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardize ecosystem services.
Here, we used a standardized protocol to measure total insect biomass using Malaise traps, deployed over 27 years in 63 nature protection areas in Germany (96 unique location-year combinations) to infer on the status and trend of local entomofauna. Our analysis estimates a seasonal decline of 76%, and mid-summer decline of 82% in flying insect biomass over the 27 years of study.
We show that this decline is apparent regardless of habitat type, while changes in weather, land use, and habitat characteristics cannot explain this overall decline.

 

Luring hornets: Scientists unlock sex pheromone of notorious honey bee predator
Luring hornets: Scientists unlock sex pheromone of notorious honey bee predator Over the past decade, Asian hornets, predatory insects with a widespread and expanding population, have invaded parts of Europe and Korea. Vespa velutina has a growing reputation as a species that proliferates rapidly, preys on honey bees and poses risks to humans.
Now a biologist at the University of California San Diego and his colleagues in Asia have developed a solution for controlling Asian hornets derived from the insect's natural chemical mating instincts.

 

Glyphosate formulations and their use for the inhibition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS)
Glyphosate formulations and their use for the inhibition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Glyphostae has been found in Honey
The patent also says that "Oxalic acid was shown to enhance the inhibition of EPSPS by glyphosate" so once again, we beekeepers could be making things worse through our varroa treatments. The recent rise in popularity of oxalic treatments might also explain the lack of evidence of prior problems.

 

Europe’s Stone Age fishers used beeswax to make a point
Europe’s Stone Age fishers used beeswax to make a point Late Stone Age people got a grip thanks to honeybees. Northern Europeans attached a barbed bone point to a handle of some kind with a beeswax adhesive around 13,000 years ago, scientists say. The result: a fishing spear.
Using beeswax glue to make tools was common in Africa as early as 40,000 years ago. But this spear is the first evidence of its use in cold parts of Europe at a time toward the end of the Stone Age when the glaciers were receding, say archaeologist Michael Baales of LWL-Archӓologie für Westfalen in Olpe, Germany, and his colleagues.

 

Honey tests reveal global contamination by bee-harming pesticides
Honey tests reveal global contamination by bee-harming pesticides Honey from across the world is contaminated with potent pesticides known to harm bees, new research shows, plus supplementary materials and methodology, clearly revealing the global exposure of vital pollinators for the first time.
Almost 200 samples of honey were analysed for neonicotinoid insecticides and 75% contained the chemicals, with most contaminated with multiple types. Bees range over many kilometres to collect nectar and pollen, making the honey they produce an excellent indicator of the pesticide pollution across their local landscape.

 

World’s Oldest Beehives Farmed in Israel at Time of Prophet Elisha
World’s Oldest Beehives Farmed in Israel at Time of Prophet Elisha Beeswax was found at the bottom of the ancient beehives excavated at Tel Rehov in the Jordan Valley, the oldest ever discovered.
An Israeli archaeologist made a remarkable and rare discovery to ensure that all of Israel has a year as sweet as honey, while helping understand the Bible just a little bit better.
Hebrew University professor Amihai Mazar was exploring an archaeological dig at a site in the Jordan Valley called Tel Rehov when he found evidence of beekeeping 3,000 years ago, the oldest evidence of this industry ever discovered

 

Surprising Discovery: Nectar-Living Microbes Influence a Pollinator's Foraging Preference
Surprising Discovery: Nectar-Living Microbes Influence a Pollinator's Foraging Preference Nectar-living microbes release scents or volatile compounds, too, and can influence a pollinator's foraging preference, according to newly published research led by UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette.
The groundbreaking research shows that nectar-inhabiting species of bacteria and fungi “can influence pollinator preference through differential volatile production,” said Vannette, an assistant professor in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology.

 

Severe threats to biodiversity from neonicotinoid pesticides revealed in latest scientific review
Severe threats to biodiversity from neonicotinoid pesticides revealed in latest scientific review Neonicotinoid pesticides pose severe threats to ecosystems worldwide, according to an update to the world’s most comprehensive scientific review of the ecological impacts of systemic pesticides released by IUCN's Task Force on Systemic Pesticides (TFSP) this week.
The second edition of the Worldwide Integrated Assessment of the Effects of Systemic Pesticides on Biodiversity and Ecosystems synthesises more than 500 studies since 2014, including some industry-sponsored studies. It was released by the TFSP,an international group of independent scientists convened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

 

Police Have Arrested A Beekeeper In Relation To The Theft Of Nearly $200,000 Worth Of Beehives
 Police Have Arrested A Beekeeper In Relation To The Theft Of Nearly $200,000 Worth Of Beehives A 46-year-old Bay of Plenty man was arrested in Northland and charged with burglary and receiving stolen property.
Police recovered 120 hives last week, and said they found 80 more when they arrested the man.
To date, Bay of Plenty Police have recovered around $150,000 to $200,000 worth of stolen beehives and beekeeping equipment following a spate of thefts in the region.

 

Court: EPA Must Reveal Information on Pesticides' Harms to Endangered Species
Court: EPA Must Reveal Information on Pesticides' Harms to Endangered Species Responding to a lawsuit filed by the Center for Biological Diversity, a federal judge has ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency failed to justify withholding more than 140 documents on the harm to protected wildlife from the highly toxic pesticide Enlist Duo. [Contains two components — 2,4-D and glyphosate]
The case involved the EPA’s controversial decision to approve use of Enlist Duo in 16 states even though the agency found the herbicide likely puts dozens of endangered and threatened species at risk.

 

Do lime trees kill bees?
Do lime trees kill bees? Public interest in bees is intense. There's rarely a week that goes by without a story in the press about populations plummeting. Although most of these stories focus on chemical pesticides, other factors may also be affecting bee survival. At Kew, we've been studying bees for years, and investigating how the plants they visit for nectar and pollen may play a part in their survival. Nectar and pollen are the main sources of protein, sugars and fats for bees, but these rewards that plants offer in return for the bee's pollination service may contain other plant chemicals, some of which may be bioactive or toxic. We are particularly interested in these substances because while some may harm bees, others may be beneficial.

 

Might dicamba be affecting pollinators?
Might dicamba be affecting pollinators? That spurred Richard to do some more research to “see if I was reading too much into the situation. Well, I found a study from Penn State University that shows where there is widespread dicamba use in an area there would be enough visible drift and volatility to damage all the vegetation. The study found it would decrease pollinator habitat by 50 percent and pollinator visits by 50 percent.”

 

Asian hornet identified in Devon
Asian hornet identified in Devon The National Bee Unit has confirmed a sighting of the Asian hornet at an apiary near Woolacombe in Devon.
The Asian hornet is smaller than our native hornet and poses no greater risk to human health than a bee. However, they do pose a risk to honey bees.
This is the first confirmed sighting since last year, when a nest was discovered in the Tetbury area in Gloucestershire. That Asian hornet incursion was successfully contained by bee inspectors who promptly tracked down and destroyed the nest.

 

Warning! Worldwide Recall of EpiPens. What You Need to Know !
Warning! Worldwide Recall of EpiPens. What You Need to Know ! The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is alerting consumers that Meridian Medical Technology is voluntarily recalling 13 lots of Mylan’s EpiPen and EpiPen Jr. Auto-Injector products. This is due to a defect that can cause the device to fail to activate (which can be deadly in case of an anaphylactic reaction).

 

Bees are in decline but backyard hives won’t save them
Bees are in decline but backyard hives won’t save them Some experts say the trend of backyard beekeeping could at best do little to save bees, and at worst leave certain species worse off

 

Assumed safety of pesticide use is false, says top government scientist
Assumed safety of pesticide use is false, says top government scientist Damning assessment by one of the UK’s chief scientific advisers says global regulations have ignored the impacts of ‘dosing whole landscapes’ and must change
The assumption by regulators around the world that it is safe to use pesticides at industrial scales across landscapes is false, according to a chief scientific adviser to the UK government.
The lack of any limit on the total amount of pesticides used and the virtual absence of monitoring of their effects in the environment means it can take years for the impacts to become apparent, say Prof Ian Boyd and his colleague Alice Milner in a new article.

 

Farmer wants a revolution: 'How is this not genocide?'
Farmer wants a revolution: 'How is this not genocide?' Massy is among scientists who believe we have entered a new geological epoch, the life-threatening Anthropocene, where human impact has permanently altered the Earth’s geology and sustaining systems, causing ecological destruction and extinction of species. “It is the greatest crisis the planet and humanity has ever faced,” he says, sitting at his kitchen table in country New South Wales. “It makes a world war look like a little storm in a teacup. And we are in denial.”

 

Ban ‘neonic’ pesticides. Our food supplies are at risk
Ban ‘neonic’ pesticides. Our food supplies are at risk The science of pesticide development and regulation is complex, so let's put things simply: Human beings rely on food to survive. Much of that food comes from insect-pollinated plants. Modern agriculture relies on pesticides to grow that food.
But those pesticides, including best-selling neonicotinoid insecticides – we have learned, through hundreds of peer-reviewed studies from around the world – are killing the pollinators.

 

Coffee, Bees and Climate Change Are Linked In Ways You May Not Have Expected
Coffee, Bees and Climate Change Are Linked In Ways You May Not Have Expected Pollinators such as bees play a key part of producing the beans that go into your morning cup of coffee.
In fact, they are responsible for about 20 to 25 percent of coffee production by increasing the plants' yield, Taylor Ricketts, the director of the University of Vermont's Gund Institute for Environment, tells The Two-Way. Bees actually increase the quality of the beans by making their size more uniform.
But climate change is threatening both pollinators and the areas where coffee can grow. A new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says it is the first to model the impact of climate change on both coffee and pollinators.

 


How Do Bees Make Honey?

 

European Court of Justice Attempts to Stop Democratic EU Bans on GM Crops
European Court of Justice Attempts to Stop Democratic EU Bans on GM Crops The European Court of Justice attempted to remove the right of democratically elected governments across the European Union (EU) to ban genetically modified crops in a ruling released on Wednesday, in a move that has led to outrage in many EU countries.

 

Can You Pick the Bees Out of This Insect Lineup ?
Can You Pick the Bees Out of This Insect Lineup ? How can we save the pollinators if we don't even recognize them ?
Some of the insects pictured are bees, and some are not. Can you tell which are which ? [Follow the link]

 

Robotics modelled on bees
Robotics modelled on bees In a project funded by the Austrian Science Fund FWF, a research group from Graz is investigating the behaviour of young honeybees immediately after hatching and successfully transfers this to robots. The bees' brood-care strategies turn out to be surprisingly efficient.
It is well-known that bees live in highly organised systems. In contrast to wasps or bumble bees, their special form of organisation helps the entire colony survive in the hive. What has been little known until now was the behaviour of very young bees on the day of hatching.

 

Honeygate: How Europe Is Being Flooded With Fake Honey
Honeygate: How Europe Is Being Flooded With Fake Honey Cheap imports of counterfeit honey are endangering beekeeping around the world, and the consequences for world food production are severe.
Foreign sugars were found 1.4 times in every 10 honey samples tested by the European Joint Research Centre, according to research published in December 2016.
The research was undertaken in response to a report by the European Parliament on the most faked foods, in which honey was ranked 6th.

 

Beekeepers affected by Harvey 2017
Beekeepers affected by Harvey 2017 Steven Brackmann President of Houston Beekeepers Association is working to raise funds to help our fellow local beekeepers recover from the devastating loss caused by Hurricane Harvey.
Not only thousands of homes and businesses have been affected by Hurricane Harvey. Many beekeepers in the Southern Texas region have lost their hives to wind damage and raging flood waters. Our goal is to help our fellow beekeepers recover from this devastating disaster and to help replace the honey bee colonies that were destroyed. With the funds raised we can purchase Honey Bees, Queens and lost equipments such as hive bodies, frames, etc.

 

Pollen stays on bee bodies right where flowers need it for pollination
Pollen stays on bee bodies right where flowers need it for pollination After grooming, bees still have pollen on body parts that match the position of flower pollen-sacs and stigmas according to a new study.
Flowers depend on pollen for pollination, and flower-visiting bees collect large quantities of pollen to feed their larvae. However, there has been little work on flower-pollinator interactions in view of this conflict over pollen. Field observations suggest that flower-visiting bees have residual patches of pollen after grooming, and it has been hypothesized that these ungroomed body parts serve as "safe sites" that transfer pollen from one flower to another.

 


Neonic pesticides 'worse for bees than previously thought'
A Canadian field study suggests that the negative effects of neonicotinoids on bee colonies is worse than previously thought. Jim Drury reports.

 

Fipronil crisis: Why should we keep on using these toxic substances ?
Fipronil crisis: Why should we keep on using these toxic substances ? The withdrawal of millions of eggs from the market produced in the Netherlands and Belgium should motivate the EU to shift towards a different model of agriculture, argues Martin Dermine.
Martin Dermine is a veterinarian, beekeeper and project coordinator at Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Europe.
But this is not the first scandal linked to Fipronil. This insecticide was made famous, together with the no-less-famous neonicotinoids, because they have been responsible for the death of millions of honeybees in Europe

 

Honeybees become workers or queens depending on the plant microRNAs in their diet
Honeybees become workers or queens depending on the plant microRNAs in their diet Bee larvae develop into workers, in part, because their diet of pollen and honey, called beebread, is rich in plant regulatory molecules called microRNAs, which delay development and keep their ovaries inactive. Xi Chen of Nanjing University in China and colleagues, report these August 31, 2017 in PLOS Genetics.

 

Yemen's prized honey industry stung by war
Yemen's prized honey industry stung by war Yemen's ruinous civil war has taken its toll on one of the impoverished country's prized exports - its coveted honey.
Thick, rich and as dense as liquid gold, Yemen's honey has traditionally been sought after in the oil-rich Gulf, where it is seen as a delicious and natural way to boost one's immune system.
The best of Yemen's honey, known as Sidr, comes from the Hadramawt region in the southeast, which has been gripped by unrest for years.

 

37 Million Bees Found Dead In Ontario, Canada After Planting Large GMO Corn Field
37 Million Bees Found Dead In Ontario, Canada After Planting Large GMO Corn Field Millions of bees dropped dead after GMO corn was planted few weeks ago in Ontario, Canada. The local beekeeper, Dave Schuit who produces honey in Elmwood lost about 37 million bees which are about 600 hives.
“Once the corn started to get planted our bees died by the millions,” Schuit said. While many beekeepers blame neonicotinoids, or “neonics.” for colony collapse of bees and many countries in EU have banned neonicotinoid class of pesticides, the US Department of Agriculture fails to ban insecticides known as neonicotinoids, manufactured by Bayer CropScience Inc.

 

Study of bee health finds no natural medicine in once-promising compound
Study of bee health finds no natural medicine in once-promising compound Doctoral candidate Evan Palmer-Young and his advisor, evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler, had reported in 2015 that a common parasitic infection of bumble bees was reduced when the bees fed on anabasine in sugar water. Anabasine is a natural alkaloid, nicotine-like chemical found in plant nectar. The researchers had hoped their finding was evidence that bees may use "nature's medicine cabinet" to rid themselves of the intestinal parasite Crithidia bombi, which can decrease the survival of queen bees over the winter and hamper the success of young colonies in the spring.
But as they report in the current issue of PLOS ONE, those results were not borne out with further investigation.

 

What's really the point of wasps ?
What's really the point of wasps ? A new citizen science survey aims to shed light on that fixture of summertime in the outdoors: the wasp. Though much maligned, these fascinating creatures perform a vital ecological role, say scientists.

 

Monty Don: gardeners should stop pulling up dandelions and ‘allow a little disorder' to save the bees
Monty Don: gardeners should stop pulling up dandelions and ‘allow a little disorder' to save the bees Gardeners should stop pulling up dandelions and instead ‘allow a little disorder’ in their plots to help the bees, Monty Don has said.
The gardening expert and amateur beekeeper said that plight of Britain’s bees was now desperate and without more help there would be ‘no pollination, no food, no more mankind.’

 


Renan Ozturk and Mark Synnott travel to Nepal with National Geographic to experience the last traditional honey harvest. Watch exclusive, behind the scenes footage of the harvest here.

 

Popular Pesticides Keep Bumblebees From Laying Eggs
Popular Pesticides Keep Bumblebees From Laying Eggs Wild bees, such as bumblebees, don’t get as much love as honeybees, but they should. They play just as crucial a role in pollinating many fruits, vegetables, and wildflowers, and compared to managed colonies of honeybees, they’re in much greater jeopardy.
A group of scientists in the United Kingdom decided to look at how bumblebee queens are affected by some widely used and highly controversial pesticides known as neonicotinoids. What they found isn’t pretty.

 

Have flowers devised the ultimate weapon of distraction ?
Have flowers devised the ultimate weapon of distraction ? Nectar, the high-energy 'honey' produced by flowers, might be a brilliant distraction technique to help protect a flower's reproductive parts, according to new research.
Rather than merely providing a 'come-on' to bees and other insects to attract them to pollinate the flower, nectar could be playing a much more subtle and entrancing role.
Scientists from across the world have studied the part played by herbivores, such as sawflies, which eat petals and nectar, on an iris found in the Himalayas. They are now confident that a visiting insect which feasts on the nectar and the gland which produces it, and makes merry, is playing into the hands of the flower and ensuring it survives and thrives.

 

Articles Link Pesticides to Soil Microbiota and Gut Microbiome Poisoning and Resulting Diseases
Beyond Pesticides Journal Articles Link Pesticides to Soil Microbiota and Gut Microbiome Poisoning and Resulting Diseases Two critical articles to advance the importance of community discussion and action on organic and sustainable practices. The lead article, Sustaining Life: From Soil Microbiota to Gut Microbiome documenting the importance of soil microbiota to healthy soil, resilient plants, and sustainability. This piece explains the essentiality of bacteria in the human gut to a healthy life, with profound implications for both agriculture and medicine.
Also in the Journal, Monsanto’s Roundup (Glyphosate) Exposed, documents the science linking the most widely used herbicide on the planet, Monsanto’s glyphosate, to the blocking of an enzyme that supports the essential pathway for beneficial bacteria, critical to human health.

 

Pesticide Levels Harmful to Aquatic Life Found in Majority of Streams Analyzed in Midwest
Pesticide Levels Harmful to Aquatic Life Found in Majority of Streams Analyzed in Midwest A new analysis published this month by U.S. Geological Survey scientists found pesticides at high enough concentrations to harm already imperiled aquatic invertebrates in more than half of 100 streams studied in the Midwest and Great Plains. The pesticide levels threaten species like the Hine's emerald dragonfly and the sheepnose mussel.
The USGS study, published in the journal Science of the Total Environment, found an average of 54 pesticides in each stream in both agricultural and urban areas, spotlighting the ever-broadening contamination of waterways caused by the nation’s escalating use of pesticides.
“This study exposes the hidden harm of our increasing addiction to pesticides,” said Nathan Donley, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity. “When we see pesticides doing this kind of widespread harm to aquatic animals, we can be sure it has dangerous cascading effects on the entire web of life, including humans.”

 

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